English Revolution

NOUN
  1. the revolution against James II; there was little armed resistance to William and Mary in England although battles were fought in Scotland and Ireland (1688-1689)
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How To Use English Revolution In A Sentence

  • Waldron recognises Locke's debt to the most plebeian elements of the English revolution and thinks that he is closer to the Levellers than is often supposed.
  • With his insistence that Marxism emerged from the Enlightenment by a process of "sublation" or "aufheben," Steiner is suggesting that Marx and Engels rejected the conception of equality that had been developed in the course of the Enlightenment, advanced in the English Revolution and made a principle of the bourgeois revolution in America and France. undefined
  • This dissenting tradition reached its zenith during in the English Revolution of the 1640's where the Levellers played a major role in Cromwell's New Model Army, advocating very radical ideas.
  • Benn goes on to say that the founders of the socialist tradition in England were the radical Christian dissenters of the English Revolution (the Levelers and Diggers) who resisted the privatization of communally owned village land.
  • The British historian Lawrence Stone pointed out this relationship in his study of the English revolution in the 16th and 17th centuries.
  • Benn goes on to say that the founders of the socialist tradition in England were the radical Christian dissenters of the English Revolution (the Levelers and Diggers) who resisted the privatization of communally owned village land.
  • On the other hand, as an active participant in the English Revolution, Milton was directly influenced by it. His passion for the Revolution likewise brought about the heroic Satan.
  • This dissenting tradition reached its zenith during in the English Revolution of the 1640's where the Levellers played a major role in Cromwell's New Model Army, advocating very radical ideas.
  • Waldron recognises Locke's debt to the most plebeian elements of the English revolution and thinks that he is closer to the Levellers than is often supposed.
  • These were - so the pamphlets alleged - a radical sect during the English Revolution, whose most striking tenet was that the attainment of a sanctified state involved the adoption of the prelapsarian nakedness of humanity's first father.
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