end-stopped

ADJECTIVE
  1. (verse) having a rhetorical pause at the end of each line
Linguix Browser extension
Fix your writing
on millions of websites
Start Error-Free Writing Linguix pencil

How To Use end-stopped In A Sentence

  • She or he needs an instinctive sense of where lines should end, how end-stopped they might be, and which ones call for enjambment, their sense flowing lyrically over the tiny pause and into a line that follows.
  • Where the line is end-stopped by punctuation, the next line frequently begins with a conjunction, and the meaning flows on.
  • The end-stopped couplets of ‘Manufacturing’ dissect and examine visual experience, comparing its snapshot moments to the uneasy ongoingness of thought, hearing, and recollection.
  • Thus, the elastic sentence of the Dead Man poems offers plenty of variety even though every line is end-stopped.
  • Some poems play frequently enjambed lines against end-stopped stanzas; others build up successively stronger enjambments in order to emphasise one big stop.
  • She or he needs an instinctive sense of where lines should end, how end-stopped they might be, and which ones call for enjambment, their sense flowing lyrically over the tiny pause and into a line that follows.
  • Even when they employ new or traditional auditory forms, they often tone down the musical effects by deliberately flattening the rhythms, avoiding end-stopped lines, and eliminating noticeable alliteration or assonance.
  • One obvious example of this is the difference between end-stopped lines and lines that exhibit weaker and stronger kinds of enjambment.
  • The more important metrical tests include the following: the frequency of rhyme, whether in the heroic couplet or, as not uncommonly occurs in early plays, in alternates and even such elaborate arrangements as the sonnet; doggerel lines; alexandrines, or lines of twelve syllables; the presence of an extra syllable before a pause within the line; short lines, especially at the end of speeches; the substitution of other feet for the regular iambic movement of blank verse; weak and light endings; and, most valuable, the position of the pause in the line ( "end-stopped" or "run on"), and feminine endings or hypermetrical lines, such as The Facts About Shakespeare
  • All eight lines of the poem are end-stopped, but the two that are not punctuated exploit the pauses.
View all
This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy