[ US /ˈɛnd/ ]
[ UK /ˈɛnd/ ]
NOUN
  1. either extremity of something that has length
    the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix
    they rode to the end of the line
    she knotted the end of the thread
    the end of the pier
  2. a final part or section
    Start at the beginning and go on until you come to the end
    we have given it at the end of the section since it involves the calculus
  3. a final state
    the so-called glorious experiment came to an inglorious end
    he came to a bad end
  4. (American football) a position on the line of scrimmage
    no one wanted to play end
  5. the point in time at which something ends
    the end of the year
    the ending of warranty period
  6. a piece of cloth that is left over after the rest has been used or sold
  7. the state of affairs that a plan is intended to achieve and that (when achieved) terminates behavior intended to achieve it
    the ends justify the means
  8. the surface at either extremity of a three-dimensional object
    one end of the box was marked `This side up'
  9. a boundary marking the extremities of something
    the end of town
  10. (football) the person who plays at one end of the line of scrimmage
    the end managed to hold onto the pass
  11. the part you are expected to play
    he held up his end
  12. one of two places from which people are communicating to each other
    the phone rang at the other end
    both ends wrote at the same time
  13. the last section of a communication
    in conclusion I want to say...
  14. the final stage or concluding parts of an event or occurrence
    the end was exciting
    I had to miss the last of the movie
VERB
  1. bring to an end or halt
    The attack on Poland terminated the relatively peaceful period after WW I
    She ended their friendship when she found out that he had once been convicted of a crime
  2. put an end to
    The terrible news ended our hopes that he had survived
  3. be the end of; be the last or concluding part of
    This sad scene ended the movie
  4. have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense; either spatial or metaphorical
    the bronchioles terminate in a capillary bed
    My property ends by the bushes
    Your rights stop where you infringe upon the rights of other
    The symphony ends in a pianissimo
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How To Use end In A Sentence

  • Within five years, a unified currency in 1933 the "central" issue of "legal tender" currency has been relatively stable, so Donglai Bank has to resume business.
  • The aircraft descended into a wetland area and had since been forgotten about as it sank below the surface. Times, Sunday Times
  • Not bad for someone who failed to shine at school and feared he would end up in a coalyard. The Sun
  • Spending on a perennial effort to expand gambling at race tracks, known as "racino," increased four-fold to about $620,000 in 2010. StarTribune.com rss feed
  • We had engaged a very nice mare and stanhope, which we knew we could depend upon, when, the day before the race, the chestnut was declared lame, and not a presentable four-legged animal was to be hired in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846
  • The following years were characterized by rifts with Russia, in which the Ukraine jealously guarded its own independence against its overbearing neighbour.
  • The speech was brimming with ideas for rewarding work and reducing dependency. Times, Sunday Times
  • The protests were going on about 1 kilometers away in the main street and some of the protesting crowd were running from tear gass used among them, towards Salehi St. The film is shot by my friend who was standing beside me. Iran Election Live-Blogging (Saturday June 20 Part II)
  • Then there are the PIP implant problems that thousands of women have had to contend with. The Sun
  • Forbes: In terms of scale, the size of a bank for lending, is there a point where being bigger does not make you more efficient in lending? Transcript: Richard Bove
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