VERB
  1. enclose in a bower
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How To Use embower In A Sentence

  • We passed ancient cottages embowered with climbing roses that Edward Elgar must have known as he cycled here on what he called his "trusty steed". Country diary: Malvern Hills
  • How lovingly and admiringly do we follow him on his way from London, taking his last view of those many sweet scenes which were thenceforward to embower in his memory all the joys of more than forty years! The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 75, January, 1864
  • Tom picked a few, and they ate them and still said almost nothing until they reached the wrought-iron gate of a community that was embowered by a high red-brick wall. Rot & Ruin
  • Garden parties had been heard of, were a trifle repetitional, and even dull, but at this one there was real music and real dancing, and clever entertainments were given at intervals in a green-embowered little theatre, erected for the occasion. The Shuttle
  • The minstrels were embowered in greenery as they played waltzes and quadrilles, which were danced with great zest, and the hall rang with good-humored laughter . . . A Renegade History of the United States
  • -- Across the heath, encircled with fences of uncouth stones, stands a stern record of feudal yore; at the next turn peeps the rectory, encircled with old firs, trained fruit trees, and affectionate ivy; beneath yon darkened thickets rolls the lazy Ure, expanding into laky broadness; and, beyond yon western woods, which embower the peaceful hamlet, are seen the The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 12, No. 343, November 29, 1828
  • Vines were planted that in the course of time would cover and embower it; there was a tiny fireplace for chilly days. Mark Twain: A Biography
  • The homestead is sitting there tranquilly on its hilltop, embowered by an orchard -- fig, apple, pear, orange, lemon, and peach trees, and grape vines, all heavy laden with fruit. War Nears New Zealand
  • There they sit, the two old friends, embowered in the snugness of their first-floor rooms.
  • The valley itself, rich and wooded, with the little river running its course, marked by a thick embowering of trees; the hills that enclosed the valley taking every form of beauty, sometimes wild and sometimes tame, heathery and barren, rough and rocky, and again rounded and soft. The Old Helmet
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