emancipator

[ UK /ɪmˈɑːnsɪpˌe‍ɪtɐ/ ]
NOUN
  1. someone who frees others from bondage
    Lincoln is known as the Great Emancipator
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How To Use emancipator In A Sentence

  • Literature and politics have always laid claim to Dublin's O'Connell Street, bookended by statues of James Joyce and Catholic emancipator Daniel O'Connell. Tony Blair's book signing in Dublin mixes Good Friday with bad Iraq
  • Cheap and unlimited energy as the emancipator of our modern slaves. "Power" by Harl Vincent, part 3
  • Finally, we shall briefly discuss the emancipatory values espoused by Marxists.
  • Most importantly, he will be remembered as the emancipator of other untouchables and the jurist in charge of drafting the constitution of the Indian republic. Unthinkable? An Ambedkar memorial | Editorial
  • A warm emancipatory joy welled up inside me; unbound from ancient strictures, I could once again focus on the adventure ahead.
  • Now there was a practice familiar to those times; that when a congiary or any other popular liberality was announced, multitudes were enfranchised by avaricious masters in order to make them capable of the bounty, (as citizens,) and yet under the condition of transferring to their emancipators whatsoever they should receive; _ina ton dæmosios d domenon siton lambanontes chata mæna -- pherosi tois dedochasi tæn eleutherian_ says Dionysius of Halicarnassus, in order that after receiving the corn given publicly in every month, they might carry it to those who had bestowed upon them their freedom. The Caesars
  • Vázquez-Arroyo develops and defends his emancipatory reading of Adorno in what he calls a minima humana or critical humanism that stands for universal human freedom without importing anything like a thick conception of human identity into the universal sphere. TELOSscope: The Telos Press blog
  • Though arguably the most liberal of the tsars, the emancipator of the serfs, he was assassinated by revolutionaries. Edge
  • Now there was a practice familiar to those times; that when a congiary or any other popular liberality was announced, multitudes were enfranchised by avaricious masters in order to make them capable of the bounty, (as citizens,) and yet under the condition of transferring to their emancipators whatsoever they should receive; _ina ton dæmosios d domenon siton lambanontes chata mæna -- pherosi tois dedochasi tæn eleutherian_ says Dionysius of Halicarnassus, in order that after receiving the corn given publicly in every month, they might carry it to those who had bestowed upon them their freedom. The Caesars
  • Lincoln is known as the Great Emancipator
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