eldest

[ UK /ˈɛldəst/ ]
[ US /ˈɛɫdəst/ ]
NOUN
  1. the offspring who came first in the order of birth
ADJECTIVE
  1. first in order of birth
    the firstborn child
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How To Use eldest In A Sentence

  • And when they espied the duke’s daughter, that was a full fair woman, then by their false covin they made debate betwixt themself, and the duke of his goodness would have departed them, and there they slew him and his eldest son. Chapter XV. The Thirteenth Book. How Sir Galahad Fought with the Knights of the Castle, and Destroyed the Wicked Custom
  • The cards are dealt in rotation to the right, beginning with the eldest hand.
  • When in 1254 he created an apanage for his eldest son, Edward, two of its principal components were the lordship of Ireland and the earldom of Chester, within which was comprised several Welsh lordships.
  • I was born and brought up here, the eldest son of Irish parents.
  • She was plain-featured, and had rather a severe expression on her face; her dress was as rich as any morning dress could be; her voice deep and unmodulated, -- what in a lower rank of life would have been called gruff; but that was not a word to apply to Lady Cuxhaven, the eldest daughter of the earl and countess. Wives and Daughters
  • We usually hear from the eldest grandson regularly but I suspect we are being punished for not approving. Times, Sunday Times
  • It did not surprise her when Fanny said, "Now, Sophie dear, it seems only right and just that you should inherit the hat shop when I retire, being the eldest as you are.
  • He was planning to legitimise his eldest baseborn son and name him heir. TREASON KEEP
  • The title passes by inheritance to the eldest son.
  • His eldest son John was ordained as deacon, serving as curate under his father at Llangeitho.
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