[ US /ˈaɪðɝ, ˈiðɝ/ ]
[ UK /ˈa‍ɪðɐ/ ]
ADVERB
  1. after a negative statement used as an intensive meaning something like `likewise' or `also'
    if you don't order dessert I won't either
    I don't know either
    he isn't stupid, but he isn't exactly a genius either
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How To Use either In A Sentence

  • It's not bad but neither is it brilliant - which won't bother 99 per cent of buyers one jot as they are in it for the image.
  • The brightly colored outfits may be made of either cotton or such dressy fabrics as velvet, satin, and lamé.
  • Sir, his definement suffers no perdition in you; though, I know, to divide him inventorially would dizzy the arithmetic of memory, and yet but yaw neither, in respect of his quick sail. Act V. Scene II. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
  • These planes are made with two separate stocks held together with either metal or turned wooden screws.
  • With no warning signs on either side and under poor lighting, the road is a death trap for motorists.
  • Success is neither a gift nor a blessing. Success is what you deserve. You work for and earn your success. Dr T.P.Chia 
  • There are no problems, either, in regard to fuels and lubricants, that is, in the refining industry. The Speech
  • The lower opening is formed by the twelfth thoracic vertebra behind, by the eleventh and twelfth ribs at the sides, and in front by the cartilages of the tenth, ninth, eighth, and seventh ribs, which ascend on either side and form an angle, the subcostal angle, into the apex of which the xiphoid process projects. II. Osteology. 4. The Thorax
  • But, fortunately, there were cavities in the two teeth on either side of the gap -- one in the first molar and one in the palatine surface of the cuspid; might he not drill a socket in the remaining root and sockets in the molar and cuspid, and, partly by bridging, partly by crowning, fill in the gap? McTeague
  • You've found our 404 page. This is the page we show you when we can't show you the page you wanted, either because it doesn't exist, or because of some other error. Instead, we're showing you the definition and the etymology for the word '404', and some Dürer rhinos (because we like them). Think this is a mistake? Click here to report this error.
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