eglantine

[ UK /ˈɛɡlɑːntˌiːn/ ]
[ US /ˈɛɡɫənˌtaɪn/ ]
NOUN
  1. Eurasian rose with prickly stems and fragrant leaves and bright pink flowers followed by scarlet hips
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How To Use eglantine In A Sentence

  • The pale primrose, that flower most like thy face; the bluebell, like thy clear veins; and the leaf of eglantine, which is not sweeter than was thy breath; all these will I strew over thee. Cymbeline
  • The pale primrose, that flower most like thy face; the blue-bell, like thy clear veins; and the leaf of eglantine, which is not sweeter than was thy breath; all these will I strew over thee. Tales from Shakespeare
  • The Eglantine is the poet's flower.
  • Conduit Street, Tailors; and Mr. Eglantine, the celebrated perruquier and perfumer of Bond Street, whose soaps, razors, and patent ventilating scalps are know throughout Europe. Mens Wives
  • Among their green robes may be seen thousands of beautiful wild-flowers, -- the sweet-scented laurustinus, all sorts of running vetches and wild sweet-pea, the delicate vases of dewy morning-glories, clusters of eglantine or sweetbrier roses, fragrant acacia-blossoms covered with bees and buzzing flies, the gold of glowing gorses, and scores of purple and yellow flowers, of which I know not the names. The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 31, May, 1860
  • Within this tent was a closet containing the carpet of the lord Solomon (on whom be peace!); and the pavilion was compassed about with a vast garden full of fruit trees and streams; while near the palace were beds of roses and basil and eglantine and all manner sweet-smelling herbs and flowers. The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night
  • Naturally he loves ‘the sweet smell of different flowers’ … he notes the sweetness of the violet, the eglantine (sweet briar) and the damask rose; but it is suggestive that in his most sustained and exquisite appreciation of the rose, what chiefly appeals to him is the fact that, unlike other flowers, roses even when faded never smell badly, but that Flowers, Shakespeare, and the horror of bad smells
  • Among their green robes may be seen thousands of beautiful wild-flowers, -- the sweet-scented laurustinus, all sorts of running vetches and wild sweet-pea, the delicate vases of dewy morning-glories, clusters of eglantine or sweetbrier roses, fragrant acacia-blossoms covered with bees and buzzing flies, the gold of glowing gorses, and scores of purple and yellow flowers, of which I know not the names. The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 31, May, 1860
  • Fabre d'Églantine became active in Parisian politics in 1789. Names
  • He appended the appellation d'Églantine to his surname in a hoax in which he claimed to have won a golden eglantine in a literary contest. Names
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