How To Use Echolocation In A Sentence

  • Moths typically go into erratic dives when they sense that they have been detected by nearby bats using echolocation.
  • Flying foxes use their excellent eyesight more than echolocation, or bouncing sounds, to locate their food at night.
  • Physical structure and characteristic of river habitats affect echolocation design in part degree. The echolocation call of M. macrodactylus had phenotypic flexibility and eco-adaptability.
  • Sharks have an acute electric sense with which they can detect prey, dolphins can detect characteristics of objects from a distance using ultrasonic echolocation, and crabs perceive water depth by sensing water pressure.
  • Some bats seem to either fly too high to be trapped often or have supersensitive echolocation skills that help them avoid capture.
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  • Odontocete cetaceans rely upon echolocation to sense the environment and detect prey.
  • Eavesdropping in bats has been observed in a variety of species and may be very widespread, but it is probably most frequently opportunistic, meaning that bats on the wing hear echolocation calls produced during prey capture and feeding (i.e. feeding buzzes) of another con - or heterospecific bat and approach the source of the sound to profit from the same food source. PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles
  • They need to be able to process the complex information that they get from echolocation, and they need to be able to control their membranous wings.
  • Echolocation - the trick of emitting sound pulses and navigating by accurate timing of the echoes - has evolved at least four times: in bats, toothed whales, oilbirds and cave swiftlets.
  • Echolocation is a highly technical and interesting tactic.
  • The molecular phylogeny presented here is consistent with either two independent origins of echolocation within the chiropteran lineage or a single origin.
  • Like bats, dolphins use echolocation, an internal sonar system, to help them navigate, avoid predators and find food.
  • Another sensor, a sonar-like apparatus, uses echolocation to detect both distant pressure disturbances and changes of flow patterns nearby.
  • You can imagine, for instance, the way certain animals use echolocation to find a target or source.
  • Toothed whales, such as dolphins, rely on this auditory sense when hunting prey by echolocation.
  • We studied the echolocation calls and acoustic response properties in the inferior colliculus of the least horseshoe bat Rhinolophus pusillus.
  • Like bats using echolocation to navigate through the night, geophysicists rely on seismic waves for information on the Earth's deep interior.
  • Echolocation is correlated with wing movements, and if the animal omits wingbeats it reduces the effectiveness with which it can sense its environment.
  • Some bats, for example, which navigate by echolocation, both emit and hear sounds with frequencies of more than 100 kHz.
  • Echolocation works like this: bats send out a series of high-pitched squeaks and then listen for its return.
  • Using echolocation, its sophisticated sonar system, each bat may catch and eat several stomachfuls of insects in a single night.
  • Megachiroptera has only one family, Pteropodidae, and megabat species are either frugivorous or nectarivorous, lacking laryngeal echolocation and relying on olfaction or vision to search food.
  • For example, echolocation by bats and toothed whales is dependent on the sound transmission properties of air and water that can change with temperature or density.
  • Like most insectivorous bats, the New Zealand short-tailed bat hunts insects in the air by using echolocation.
  • The scheme of the algorithm is shown in this paper, and the results of simulated data and echolocation signal from brown bat demonstrate the validity of the method proposed.
  • An additional explanation for the absence of either mode in Microchiroptera is their reliance on echolocation, and their need to maintain regular sensory input.
  • The scheme of the algorithm is shown in this paper, and the results of simulated data and echolocation signal from brown bat demonstrate the validity of the method proposed.
  • Echolocation - the trick of emitting sound pulses and navigating by accurate timing of the echoes - has evolved at least four times: in bats, toothed whales, oilbirds and cave swiftlets.
  • Bats are not the only animals that use echolocation.
  • Many odontocetes can navigate by echolocation, producing sound waves using a complex system of nasal sacs and passages, and using the echoes to navigate.
  • Horseshoe bats have a special kind of echolocation (termed ‘high duty cycle’), which allows them to use the Doppler shift to detect the flutter of moth wings.
  • Another sensor, a sonar-like apparatus, uses echolocation to detect both distant pressure disturbances and changes of flow patterns nearby.
  • It's been known since the 1930s, with the discovery of bat echolocation, that animals can produce pitches too high for human hearing.
  • The rivers used by most platanistids are muddy, and these animals probably rely on echolocation more than vision to locate their prey.
  • Research suggests that noise from whale watching boats may interfere with the animals' echolocation and communication, making it more difficult for them to hunt for fish.
  • But their hearing and echolocation is the greatest almost of any animal.
  • But the whale's skull indicates it couldn't produce ultrasonic signals - meaning it didn't use sonar or echolocation, like some dolphins and certain whales do today.
  • This structure may help focus the sound emitted by these animals in echolocation and feeding.

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