ecchymosis

NOUN
  1. the purple or black-and-blue area resulting from a bruise
  2. the escape of blood from ruptured blood vessels into the surrounding tissue to form a purple or black-and-blue spot on the skin
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How To Use ecchymosis In A Sentence

  • Signs and symptoms may include diplopia, epistaxis, ecchymosis, crepitus, hypesthesia in the infraorbital nerve distribution, and restricted upward gaze secondary to inferior rectus entrapment.
  • When persons jumping from a height pitch on the heel, so as to occasion separation (diastasis) of the bones, ecchymosis of the veins, and contusion of the nerves; when these symptoms are very violent there is danger of sphacelus, and that the case may give trouble during life, for the bones are so constructed as to slip from one another, and the nerves communicate together. On The Articulations
  • If a blow be inflicted with a blunt instrument, there is produced a bruise, or _ecchymosis_, of which it is unnecessary here to describe the appearance and progress. Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology
  • It shows the localised ecchymosis as seen from the inner surface, here rather more extensive from the fact that the blood spreads more readily in the submucous tissue. Surgical Experiences in South Africa, 1899-1900 Being Mainly a Clinical Study of the Nature and Effects of Injuries Produced by Bullets of Small Calibre
  • Thus, with the hæmorrhage we get ecchymosis, and consequent red staining of the surrounding structures. Diseases of the Horse's Foot
  • Many of these patients had edema, purpura, or ecchymosis.
  • Signs of orbital injury include periorbital ecchymosis, edema, proptosis, and bony step-offs of the orbital rim.
  • Persons who, in jumping from a height, have pitched on the heel, so as to occasion diastasis (separation) of the bones, ecchymosis of the veins, and contusion of the nerves, - when these symptoms are very violent, there is danger that the parts may sphacelate, and give trouble to the patient during the remainder of his life; for these bones are so constructed as to slip past one another, and the nerves communicate together. Instruments Of Reduction
  • But if the case be not going to get worse, the ecchymosed and livid parts, and those surrounding them become greenish and not hard; for this is a satisfactory proof in all cases of ecchymosis, that they are not to get worse; but when lividity is complicated with hardness, there is danger that the part may become blackened. On Fractures
  • He comments that a patient might talk of a "shiner" whereas a doctor (holy of holies) would speak of a "periorbital ecchymosis," which is true only if you could imagine a doctor referring to cephalalgia instead of a headache or odontalgia instead of a toothache. VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol III No 1
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