early days

NOUN
  1. an early period of development
    during the youth of the project
Linguix Browser extension
Fix your writing
on millions of websites
Start Error-Free Writing Linguix pencil

How To Use early days In A Sentence

  • In the early days after the birth, it can be useful to set aside some time to rest when the baby sleeps.
  • The car is still in its early days yet it has already given glimpses of its potential.
  • It is in the early days of the rivalry that Hayes digs up the most interesting stories, such as when Cardiff's Burton scored with an extravagant scissors kick and was congratulated by players from both teams.
  • One curious survivor from the early days of headed cabbages is the enormously tall Jersey or walking stick cabbage, whose stem is as high as a man and has been recorded as reaching 5 metres.
  • In the early days, during the service, the congregants had the odd practice of auctioning the aliyoth or ‘privileges’ given to certain congregants, the money being used to maintain the synagogue.
  • The Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull, which generated by far the most buzz on the show floor, landed a seven-figure deal for a memoir that will cover its early days as a steam-venting fumarole right through to its headline-making eruption. Laurence Hughes: Things I'd Like to See This Weekend on C-SPAN's "Book TV"
  • Iwas taught a harsh lesson in my early days at Liverpool that stood me in good stead for the rest of my playing career. Times, Sunday Times
  • Our progress has been fairly slow so far, but it's early days.
  • In the early days of television, announcers looked into a camera and essentially read the news wires into it.
  • A bride, as in early days, wears a white robe woven of white cotton by her uncles.
View all
This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy