dramatize

[ US /ˈdɹæməˌtaɪz, ˈdɹɑməˌtaɪz/ ]
VERB
  1. put into dramatic form
    adopt a book for a screenplay
  2. add details to
  3. represent something in a dramatic manner
    These events dramatize the lack of social responsibility among today's youth
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How To Use dramatize In A Sentence

  • For centuries, scholars have squabbled over the design of the ship, which was crucial to defeating the Persians in the Battle of Salamis in 480 B.C., part of a wider war that included the fight at Thermopylae dramatized in the film "300. Epic Struggle: Fans Fight to Revive an Oar-Powered Greek Warship
  • He is planning to dramatize the novel.
  • Kate Augusto, Danielle Capalbo and Nick Mendez report that Ayman Nour, a leading political dissident in Egypt, has decided to return to prison and finish his sentence in order to dramatize what he calls the Egyptian government's ongoing lack of respect for democratic values. Archive 2009-05-01
  • Moreover, by invoking Nahuatl and speaking in tongues, he dramatizes the opaque materiality of language.
  • One might say that the true subject of the horror genre is the struggle for recognition of all that our civilization represses or oppresses, its reemergence dramatized, as in our nightmares, as an object of horror, a matter for terror, and the happy ending (when it exists) typically signifying the restoration of repression. January 2010
  • In the opening portion of the dance, Tuson and Olson dramatize a legend in which the wind is freed from its confinement by a bear.
  • However, like those who declared that the sky was falling in the 1980s, one cannot help feeling that Barnett has overdramatized the situation.
  • But the noose and lifeline metaphors dramatize the in-culture ‘factness’ of much writing, its consequentiality, rather than the seductive pleasures of its speculative realm.
  • Choreographed to the 1947 Stravinsky score, Orpheus cleverly deploys six dancers to dramatise the story of Orpheus and Eurydice, with a chorus of living characters (Orpheus's friends/chorus) and the inhabitants of the underworld (Death and Furies). This week's new dance
  • The internal struggles of the group are hopelessly dramatised, reading off like the plot mechanisms that they are.
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