dolourous

ADJECTIVE
  1. showing sorrow
Linguix Browser extension
Fix your writing
on millions of websites
Start Error-Free Writing Linguix pencil

How To Use dolourous In A Sentence

  • I sick with dolourous thought and weak through tears Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume II.
  • Balin that gave the dolourous stroke unto King Pellam; of Sir Tor that sought the lady's brachet and by the way overcame two knights and smote off the head of the outrageous caitiff Abelleus, -- of these and many like matters of pith and moment, full of blood and honour, told Sir Lancelot, and the people had marvel of his words. The Blue Flower
  • In e mail program, neology a yellowish vintager apprehensiveness is intelligent to dripping a new brutalisation who caravanning be straightforwardness dolourous. Rational Review
  • Through all that dolourous storm; though noise of guns Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume II.
  • Kynge Arthur, of his noble knyghtes of the Round Table, theyr mervayllous enquestes and adventures, the achyevying of the Holy Grail, and in the end the dolourous deth and departyng out of thys world of them al. Whiche book was reduced in to englysshe by Syr Thomas Malory knyght as afore is sayd, and by me enprynted and fynyshed in the abbey Stories of King Arthur and His Knights Retold from Malory's "Morte dArthur"
  • i slam my hands to my ears until it all becomes a blur of sound. and the preacher's dolourous tone lifts sky-ward but fails to reach the sky. unheimlich Diary Entry
  • Of the wars against the Saracens and misbelieving men; of the discomfiture of the Romans when they came to take truage of King Arthur; of the strife with the eleven kings and the battle that was ended but never flnished; of the Questing Beast and how King Pellinore and then Sir Palamides followed it; of Balin that gave the dolourous stroke unto King Pellam; of Sir Tor that sought the lady's brachet and by the way overcame two knights and smote off the head of the outrageous caitiff Abelleus, -- of these and many like matters of pith and moment, full of blood and honour, told Sir Lancelot, and the people bad marvel of his words. The Blue Flower
  • (ignoraunt wherfore he went in) should issue out of his maistresse chamber, the Stewarde rauished with inexplicable ioye and gladnesse, like to the pleasure of hym that had attaynde the summe of his desires, called hys Lorde to see that heauye and dolourous sighte. The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1
View all
This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy