disingenuous

[ US /dɪsɪnˈdʒɛnjuəs/ ]
[ UK /dˌɪsɪnd‍ʒˈɛnjuːəs/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. not straightforward or candid; giving a false appearance of frankness
    an ambitious, disingenuous, philistine, and hypocritical operator, who...exemplified...the most disagreeable traits of his time
    a disingenuous excuse
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How To Use disingenuous In A Sentence

  • The Israelis already possess them, operating disingenuously and outside international norms again, an exceptionalism granted by the United States’ favor andmight. The Volokh Conspiracy » Pro-Palestinian “Peace Activists”
  • That's as clear an admission as one could hope for that the entire exercise is disingenuous.
  • I assure you, I'm neither ingenuous or disingenuous here.
  • But then he got a little disingenuous. Times, Sunday Times
  • The Palace manager was being slightly disingenuous. Times, Sunday Times
  • But let's remember this: Bowman is a master dissembler and is prone to making disingenuous comments at times such as these; comments designed to deflect any suspicions that he may have had a role in this decision. Coach Savard, we hardly knew you
  • Perhaps it's his glaring vanity - it is surely disingenuous for a man in his sixties to sport such a pompadour and pretend that he doesn't want it noticed.
  • This new dispensation is likely to strike many of us as chaotic -- Grossman is being disingenuous when he writes that "None of this is good or bad," since he surely knows most of his readers judge it to be bad indeed -- especially those of us who want some of those "conventional criteria for literary value" to survive. Principles of Literary Criticism
  • This kind of disingenuousness validates dangerous nonsense as legitimate opinion and sets the table for extremism. Ian Gurvitz: Put Hate Speech in the Crosshairs
  • These were so continuously misleading and disingenuous that the lawyer politicaster who played such a rôle at Paris seemed despicable to the soldiery, and "rogue of a lawyer" was almost synonymous to the military mind with place-holder and civil ruler. The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte Vol. I. (of IV.)
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