diplomatist

NOUN
  1. an official engaged in international negotiations
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How To Use diplomatist In A Sentence

  • Remember that the rulers of Russia in those days were the most charming and cultivated people in the world, whereas the Prussian as a diplomatist was the same Prussian whom, even as an ally of ours in 1815, The Mirrors of Downing Street Some Political Reflections by a Gentleman with a Duster
  • For there was the learned president of the Geographical, with overhanging brows and slow and gentle speech; there was the foreign corresponding secretary of the Historical, a man better known as a diplomatist and an author, whose long years abroad had liberalized his mind without spoiling his open-hearted American manners. The Faith Doctor A Story of New York
  • There are people for whom professional diplomatists are out of touch, upper - class ex-Oxbridge twits, paid over-large salaries for living on the cocktail circuit.
  • You see that even the bow of a diplomatist is a serious business! Vivian Grey
  • There certainly have been a great number of successful diplomatists, as they would be called in the old days.
  • Peter Pecquius, smoothest and sliest of diplomatists, did his best to make things comfortable, for there could be little doubt that his masters most sincerely deprecated war. Life and Death of John of Barneveld, Advocate of Holland : with a view of the primary causes and movements of the Thirty Years' War — Complete (1609-15)
  • Men don't go wilily to work in these days; but if they did, the notion of poor George, who could not keep a secret or tell a lie with easy grace if it were to save his life -- the notion of making him a diplomatist is very absurd. Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 097, January, 1876
  • Modem communications has made the diplomatist's task more not less difficult simply because of the problem of keeping track of this complicated network of inter-communication.
  • The point of the book is to emphasize the role of President Lincoln as a diplomatist and of slavery as a world issue in re-evaluating the European decision not to intervene in the American conflict.
  • Besides her habitual devotees in the artistic or literary world, there were diplomatists and deputies commixed with many fair chiefs of la jeunesse doree; amongst the latter the brilliant Enguerrand de Vandemar, who, deeming the acquaintance of every celebrity essential to his own celebrity in either Carthage, the beau monde, or the demi-monde, had, two Thursdays before, made Louvier attend her soiree and present him. The Parisians — Complete
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