Dionysius

[ US /ˌdaɪəˈnɪsiəs/ ]
NOUN
  1. the tyrant of Syracuse who fought the Carthaginians (430-367 BC)
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How To Use Dionysius In A Sentence

  • Macrobius also wrote that in the rites of Liber, Roman god of fertility and wine who was also called Bacchus and identified with Dionysius, eggs were honored, worshipped, and called the symbol of the universe, the beginning of all things. Archive 2009-07-01
  • Dionysius was usually depicted with the flanks of a goat or bull to symbolise his fertility aspect.
  • Miltas the diviner, standing up in the midst of the assembly, bade them be of good cheer, and expect all happy success, for that the divine powers foreshowed that something at present glorious and resplendent should be eclipsed and obscured; nothing at this time being more splendid than the sovereignty of Dionysius, their arrival in Sicily should dim this glory, and extinguish this brightness. The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans
  • The establishment of the birth of Christ as an event marking a time from which chronological data should be calculated, was first effected about 532 A.D. by Dionysius Exiguus; and as a basis for the reckoning of time this method has come to be known as the Dionysian system, and takes for its fundamental datum A.U.C. 753, that is to say Jesus the Christ A Study of the Messiah and His Mission According to Holy Scriptures Both Ancient and Modern
  • The Dominican theologians St. Albert the Great and St. Thomas Aquinas, although they do not count beauty among the transcendentals, make a similar discourse in their commentaries on the Treaty of Pseudo-Dionysius De divinis nominibus, where the universality of beauty emerges, whose first cause is God Himself. Fr Lang on Beauty and the Liturgy
  • Now there was a practice familiar to those times; that when a congiary or any other popular liberality was announced, multitudes were enfranchised by avaricious masters in order to make them capable of the bounty, (as citizens,) and yet under the condition of transferring to their emancipators whatsoever they should receive; _ina ton dæmosios d domenon siton lambanontes chata mæna -- pherosi tois dedochasi tæn eleutherian_ says Dionysius of Halicarnassus, in order that after receiving the corn given publicly in every month, they might carry it to those who had bestowed upon them their freedom. The Caesars
  • What you were perhaps unable so far to discern from the photographs (which would be exactly the effect desired by Dientzenhofer) is the circumstance that the altar painting which you can see (showing the martyrium of St. Dionysius by the Bamberg court painter Sebastian Reinhard from 1714) is not actually on the high altar. Catholic Bamberg: Banz Abbey
  • But while in the work of Dionysius the collection of conciliary canons remained unchanged, that of the decretals was successively increased; it continued to incorporate letters of the different popes till about the middle of the eighth century when Adrian I gave (774) the collection of Dionysius to the future Emperor Charlemagne as the canonical book of the Roman Church. The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy
  • Now there was a practice familiar to those times; that when a congiary or any other popular liberality was announced, multitudes were enfranchised by avaricious masters in order to make them capable of the bounty, (as citizens,) and yet under the condition of transferring to their emancipators whatsoever they should receive; _ina ton dæmosios d domenon siton lambanontes chata mæna -- pherosi tois dedochasi tæn eleutherian_ says Dionysius of Halicarnassus, in order that after receiving the corn given publicly in every month, they might carry it to those who had bestowed upon them their freedom. The Caesars
  • But for the use of arche in the sense and with the force which we here demand for it, as "principium," not "initium" (though these Latin words do not adequately reproduce the distinction), compare the Gospel of Nicodemus, c. 25, in which Hades addresses Satan as he tou thanatou arche kai rhiza tes hamartias; and further, Dionysius the Areopagite (c. 15): ho Theos estin panton aitia kai arche; and again, Clement of Alexandria (Strom.iv. 25): ho Theos de anarchos, arche ton holon panteles. Epistles to the Seven Churches in Asia.
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