diffidence

[ UK /dˈɪfɪdəns/ ]
NOUN
  1. lack of self-confidence
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How To Use diffidence In A Sentence

  • She added with some little diffidence that the fee for a seance was a guinea, and, as she left, took a card out of a case, encrusted with glowing rubies, and gave it her. Queen Lucia
  • But there was also a certain diffidence about coming once again to the Empire Club, for I would think the 11th or 12th time. Winning Without War
  • If there was a little hesitation and diffidence as the games began, it soon vanished without a trace, for even the kids who seemed shy, lost their self-consciousness and joined wholeheartedly in the activities.
  • But there was something in this apparent diffidence. Times, Sunday Times
  • He turned to Trix and reminded her -- without diffidence and coram populo, as his habit was -- that she had promised him a stroll in the west wood. Frivolous Cupid
  • Some were put off by what they termed his diffidence, his driving ambition and perfectionism. The Do-or-Die Men
  • I promise you, the effects he writes of succeed unhappily; as of unnaturalness between the child and the parent; death, dearth, dissolutions of ancient amities; divisions in state, menaces and maledictions against king and nobles; needless diffidences, banishment of friends, dissipation of cohorts, nuptial breaches, and I know not what. King Lear
  • So I think with some reluctance, with some diffidence, I come down on the positive side of the question.
  • He turned to Trix and reminded her -- without diffidence and coram populo, as his habit was, that she had promised him a stroll in the west wood. Comedies of Courtship
  • After the initial period of diffidence and hesitation, the young ones got along quite well with one another, and became totally absorbed in the proceedings.
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