depone

VERB
  1. make a deposition; declare under oath
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How To Use depone In A Sentence

  • «deponent» because they have laid aside («dē-pōnere», _to lay aside_) the active forms. Latin for Beginners
  • Our opposing counsel were dead asleep in nappy nap land by the time Jeff whispered, essentially, “Did you infringe our patent?” and the deponent responded in another whisper, “Yeah, I guess so.” PIG’S FEET is the new MUSLIM
  • This eliminates ‘deponency’ from the discussion and attempts to communicate by the headword whether the lexeme occurs most commonly in the middle or in the active and passive forms.
  • Two of the more troublesome phenomena are verbs with an active present and future middle; and ‘passive deponents,’ i.e., ‘deponent’ verbs whose aorists are passive in form, not middle.
  • When one examines the ‘passive deponent’ verbs in question, they are a subset of the eighty-five-plus verbs that we have argued are true middles, not deponents.
  • These two females did afterwards depone that Mr Willet in his consternation uttered but one word, and called that up the stairs in a stentorian voice, six distinct times. Barnaby Rudge
  • He deponed of the conditions in the condemned section (death row) of Luzira Prison, as follows:"The living conditions are extremely depressing."
  • Another soldier deponed that he had seen Rebecca perch herself upon a high turret, and there take the form of a white swan, under which appearance she flitted three times round the castle of Torquailstone. The Mysteries of All Nations Rise and Progress of Superstition, Laws Against and Trials of Witches, Ancient and Modern Delusions Together With Strange Customs, Fables, and Tales
  • The previous section points out that Koine ‘preferred the aorist passive in the case of deponents (where a real passive meaning is at best a possibility)’.
  • She made her oath to the institution and the Scottish people in her mother tongue thus: "I, Maureen Watt, depone aat I wull be leal and bear ae fauld alleadgance tae her majesty Queen Elizabeth her airs an ony fa come aifter her anent the law."
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