demoralizing

[ US /dɪˈmɔɹəˌɫaɪzɪŋ/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. destructive of morale and self-reliance
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How To Use demoralizing In A Sentence

  • Instead of demoralizing a people, you have brought them closer together.
  • That was completely demoralising, it shattered my confidence, and I was depressed for a year.
  • Hoping to forestall Henry by attacking and demoralising his supporters, Stephen laid siege to Wallingford Castle on the Thames, a dozen miles south-east of Oxford.
  • The word "demoralising" suggests that they were concerned about the fate of the Jews in Europe. On Thursday, the Legg report will be published along with...
  • And on what credential had Upashantha been drafted in after a demoralising caning against MCC last week that saw him bowl 12 unsuccessful overs for 96 runs?
  • `Well, I know it's just harassment, but that can be demoralizing. C B GREENFIELD - A LITTLE MADNESS
  • Over the last three decades, the increase in underprepared students, coupled with what some faculty believe is administrative pressure to lower standards, has had a demoralizing effect on faculty.
  • For most job seekers, finding work can be confusing and demoralising. The Sun
  • And now Trevor Cunrow, University and College Union branch secretary, has branded the policy "demoralising" for the university's academics. News round-up
  • This afternoon, in an altogether less meaningful league fixture between the sides, Lennon returns to the Gorgie ground determined to exorcise the memory of that demoralising day.
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