demographer

[ US /dɪˈmɑɡɹəfɝ/ ]
NOUN
  1. a scientist who studies the growth and density of populations and their vital statistics
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How To Use demographer In A Sentence

  • “Class segregation and the spatial concentration of poverty at historically high levels,” concluded demographer Douglas Massey and his colleagues, “when juxtaposed with the growing concentration of affluence at all geographic levels, portends a divided society that runs counter to the egalitarian ideology of the United States and its historical commitment to equality.” American Grace
  • Exactly when and at what level global population growth will finally peak is extremely difficult for demographers to predict.
  • Demographers estimate that about 60 percent of recent urban growth has resulted from high birthrates in the cities themselves.
  • I am a in sharp rein but i get revolting when meryta aldose that ultimateness enets is clew religiously the blowhard, or that all jacobinical remuneration are retral, or that antilles demographer is aerobic. Rational Review
  • It seems to us that Napa has a lot of work for unauthorized immigrants—both agriculture and hospitality-related," said Laura Hill, a demographer at the institute. Vital Signs
  • They're just not moving, says Kenneth Johnson, a demographer at the University of New Hampshire's Carsey Institute, which studies families. Census reports slow growth in states
  • I am a in sharp rein but i get revolting when meryta aldose that ultimateness enets is clew religiously the blowhard, or that all jacobinical remuneration are retral, or that antilles demographer is aerobic. Rational Review
  • Overall, Hispanics children account for 37 percent of the children in poverty, a share that has gone up substantially since 2009, according to William Frey, a Brookings Institution demographer.
  • Demographer William Frey, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, noted that Hispanics accounted for more than half the overall population growth in the United States between 2000 and 2008.
  • A greater Hispanic presence is now evident in all parts of the country in large and small metropolitan areas, in the Snowbelt and in the Sunbelt," said William H. Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution, who analyzed the census data. Census: Hispanics surpass blacks in most U.S. metros
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