demimondaine

NOUN
  1. a female prostitute
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How To Use demimondaine In A Sentence

  • In the moralistic atmosphere of 1950s Hollywood, it was tricky to present Colette's account of the risqué demimondaine, and its glorification of the courtesans who relied on wealthy playboys and aristocrats to live in a state of opulence. France's Courtesan Queen Returns to the Silver Screen
  • She viewed herself as she was sure Jake would: a twenty-five-year-old woman, grossly tall, apparently too clumsy to hold a book, and with a demimondaine petticoat contradicting a dress sewn for a much younger woman. Hearts
  • Adapted from Colette's eponymous novel, the film follows the affair of Lea de Lonval (Michelle Pfeiffer), a retired, luscious courtesan in her fifty's, and Cheri (Rupert Friend), the exquisite, wanton son of a rival demimondaine (Kathy Bates). Erica Abeel: The Cheatin' Heart of Cheri
  • They certainly have one vocal demimondaine and craving consummate pandering Senator who is currently lusting for the American Presidency. The Democrat Demimondaine and Consummate Pandering Politician: Hillary Clinton
  • Alison knew of this place from her early days as one of the demimondaine-but of course, unlike the rest of her sisters-in-sin, she'd had the means at her disposal to ensure she got a wedding ring before too long into her arrangement. Phoenix And Ashes
  • She refused to have a life of a demimondaine (courtesan). Lesley M. M. Blume: Coco Before Chanel's Audrey Tautou Talks Fashion, Fury, And Smoking
  • We are told what was proper dress for a bourgeoise and what was stylish for a demimondaine. The Times Literary Supplement
  • In an effort to sanitize Paramount's portrait of a demimondaine, the studio publicity department churned out reams of flapdoodle, defining Holly as a "kook" rather than a B-girl. When Words Go Lightly to Screen
  • We are told what was proper dress for a bourgeoise and what was stylish for a demimondaine. The Times Literary Supplement
  • Valérie Larbin was what the chroniclers of society—or their putative sons, the social novelists—would have called a demimondaine. Valfierno
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