deadly nightshade

NOUN
  1. poisonous perennial Old World vine having violet flowers and oval coral-red berries; widespread weed in North America
  2. perennial Eurasian herb with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries; extensively grown in United States; roots and leaves yield atropine
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How To Use deadly nightshade In A Sentence

  • Salpiglossis belongs to the always-interesting Solanaceae family, which includes edible fruits such as tomatoes, potatoes and eggplants but also tobacco, deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) and poisonous jimsonweed (Datura stramonium). SFGate: Top News Stories
  • These so-called host plants include many broadleaf weeds and cover crops such as nettles, mallow, chicory, dandelion, thistles, bindweed, deadly nightshade, and many clovers.
  • She was drawn to nettles and brambles and deadly nightshade and teasels and other lingering signs of ancient human habitation. Margaret Drabble | Trespassing
  • With a vigorous quiver, an Arizona sweat bee "buzz pollinates" a deadly nightshade flower.
  • We're not talking about children eating deadly nightshade.
  • Other names for belladonna include devil's herb and deadly nightshade.
  • He returned to the lab and cooked up a brew consisting of some exotic poisons: atropine (a naturally occurring alkaloid of atropia belladonna or deadly nightshade), sparteine (a compound derived from the European shrub Scotch broom, Cytisus scoparius), and pilocarpine hydrochloride (an alkaloid found in the leaves of a South American shrub, Pilocarpus jaborandi). The Very Nutty Professor
  • Also called dwale - deriving this common name from the French word for sorrow, deuil, or the Scandinavian word, dool, for sleep or delay - deadly nightshade is a very effective poison. CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]
  • Last year, over dinner, I mentioned that the stereotype of witches flying on broomsticks came about because they used to make a hallucinogenic poultice from deadly nightshade.
  • These so-called host plants include many broadleaf weeds and cover crops such as nettles, mallow, chicory, dandelion, thistles, bindweed, deadly nightshade, and many clovers.
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