[ UK /dˈɛd/ ]
[ US /ˈdɛd/ ]
NOUN
  1. people who are no longer living
    they buried the dead
  2. a time when coldness (or some other quality associated with death) is intense
    the dead of winter
ADJECTIVE
  1. not surviving in active use
    Latin is a dead language
  2. unerringly accurate
    a dead shot
    took dead aim
  3. lacking resilience or bounce
    a dead tennis ball
  4. lacking acoustic resonance
    the dead wall surfaces of a recording studio
    dead sounds characteristic of some compact discs
  5. not circulating or flowing
    stagnant water
    dead water
    dead air
  6. no longer having force or relevance
    a dead issue
  7. not yielding a return
    dead capital
    idle funds
  8. devoid of physical sensation; numb
    a public desensitized by continuous television coverage of atrocities
    she felt no discomfort as the dentist drilled her deadened tooth
    his gums were dead from the novocain
  9. drained of electric charge; discharged
    a dead battery
    left the lights on and came back to find the battery drained
  10. (followed by `to') not showing human feeling or sensitivity; unresponsive
    numb to the cries for mercy
    passersby were dead to our plea for help
  11. physically inactive
    Crater Lake is in the crater of a dead volcano of the Cascade Range
  12. the complete stoppage of an action
    came to a dead stop
  13. not showing characteristics of life especially the capacity to sustain life; no longer exerting force or having energy or heat
    the fire is dead
    dead coals
    dead soil
    Mars is a dead planet
  14. very tired
    I'm dead after that long trip
    so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere
    was all in at the end of the day
    bushed after all that exercise
  15. out of use or operation because of a fault or breakdown
    a dead telephone line
    the motor is dead
  16. no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life
    the nerve is dead
    he was marked as a dead man by the assassin
    a dead pallor
  17. devoid of activity
    this is a dead town; nothing ever happens here
ADVERB
  1. quickly and without warning
    he stopped suddenly
  2. completely and without qualification; used informally as intensifiers
    an absolutely magnificent painting
    a perfectly idiotic idea
    was dead tired
    you're perfectly right
    you can be dead sure of my innocence
    dead right
    utterly miserable
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How To Use dead In A Sentence

  • It was a simple rectangle of crudely mounded basalt rocks, a distinctive arrangement reminiscent of the way Samoans and other Polynesians marked their dead in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  • The little divil that stole the dog-team an 'wint over the Pass in the dead o' winter for to see where the world come to an ind on the ither side, just because old Matt McCarthy was afther tellin 'her fairy stories? CHAPTER I
  • The plan is a dead duck: there's no money.
  • He was afraid of waking up in the morning and finding that Jessie was dead.
  • It will take away from the classic perspective of looking at city hall dead on.
  • Winter is traditionally the dead season for the housing market.
  • But after three consecutive nights of camping out I'd had enough, especially since the last had been spent near Verdun in Le Foret du Mort Homme, which translates as Dead Man's Forest.
  • Having drop-dead gorgeous, private, windowed offices makes it a lot easier to recruit the kinds of superstars that produce ten times as much as the merely brilliant software developers.
  • My monitor fills with images of two men saluting, grinning thumbs up or looking dead serious.
  • An Iron Ancestor is a reanimated and iron - forged dead body possessed by a ghost.
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