de facto

ADJECTIVE
  1. existing in fact whether with lawful authority or not
    de facto segregation is as real as segregation imposed by law
    a de facto state of war
ADVERB
  1. in reality or fact
    the result was, de facto, a one-party system
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How To Use de facto In A Sentence

  • The party established a de facto political cartel that excluded other parties from power.
  • This might be interpreted as a de facto recognition of the republic's independence.
  • Chops, our de facto Kiwi skipper and engineer, makes another valiant attempt to get it going with the starter cord.
  • Law firms would not dream of excluding these de facto discriminators from their hiring schedules, though.
  • As such she acts as a de facto clearing house for much of the material brought forth from academia on the topic.
  • The former sultana, for her part, still held de facto power behind the scenes at this point.
  • The Synod's declarations prevailed de jure but not de facto in the Roman Catholic Church down to the Reformation era.
  • In the United States, the Coinage Act of 1873 officially demonetized silver, legally confirming a gold-based currency that - because of silver's relatively high price - was already the de facto standard.
  • Of course, the coffee ring on the bottom is his de facto Seal of Office and a dead giveaway, but the grammar and lack of punctuation nail the lid firmly down.
  • Though much has been theorized to the contrary, such subcultures are not de facto resistant to a dominant ideology.
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