circumflex

[ UK /sˈɜːkəmflˌɛks/ ]
NOUN
  1. a diacritical mark (^) placed above a vowel in some languages to indicate a special phonetic quality
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How To Use circumflex In A Sentence

  • Results:There are closest relationships between deep iliac circumflex artery and its adjacent structures.
  • The French have had a crack at reforming plurals and circumflexes.
  • When the last syllable has a short vowel, such a penult, if accented, takes the circumflex. Greek in a Nutshell
  • The "Sho 'nuff" is not declamatory now; not fully interrogatory, either; circumflexed.) "Our leader - (" Yes?) - is the man - Deadspin
  • The lateral femoral circumflex may give rise to an obturator.
  • Ingvild, who had plucked away her nearly invisible blond eyebrows and who, by day, replaced them with penciled circumflex accents, opened the door so fast she nearly got punched by my pounding fists. As Husbands Go
  • Modern Greek also retains from the ancient language a system of three pitch accents: acute, circumflex and grave.
  • _ "The voice is circumflexed on _heaven_, _hell-doomed_, _king_, and The Canadian Elocutionist
  • Does a look-up table exist that matches whole range of such non-English letters with their nearest-looking English equivalents? I'm thinking o and u umlaut, c and s cedilla, o circumflex, Turkish g and undotted-i, Scandinavian o with a line through it, Spanish n, e with a grave and acute, accented a, the diphthongs.
  • The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the Biceps brachii and transmits a branch of the anterior humeral circumflex artery to the shoulder-joint. II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus
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