How To Use Cedrela In A Sentence

  • In the higher mountain forest, the dominant trees are mahogany Swietenia macrophylla, Tabebuia spp., cedar Cedrela odorata, Bursera simaruba and Clusia salviniie. Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, Honduras
  • Characteristic or common trees at lower elevations are, amongst others: Swietenia macrophylla, Apeiba membranacea, Bursera simaruba, Carapa guianensis, Casearia arborea, Cedrela odorata, Eugenia sp., Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, Honduras
  • Many valuable timber species are native to these forests including Virola surinamensis, Cedrela odorata, and Carapa guianensis. Solimões-Japurá moist forest
  • Species diversity is very high and members of the Lauraceae and Moraceae such as Ficus spp. and Chlorophora spp., palms, Cedrela odorata and wild avocado Persea sp. occur. Sangay National Park, Ecuador
  • Characteristic or common trees at lower elevations are, amongst others: Swietenia macrophylla, Apeiba membranacea, Bursera simaruba, Carapa guianensis, Casearia arborea, Cedrela odorata, Eugenia sp., Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, Honduras
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  • Achras sapota, Cedrela adorata, Rhedia edulis and Enterolobium cyclocarpum are common species; (b) Premontane Moist, which is very rich in species; (c) Premontane Rain with very rough topography; and (d) Lower Montane Rain where stands of Clusia spp. occur, sometimes mixed with a few other species (including palms). Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica
  • The rest of the park has never been cultivated, although there has always been occasional felling of timber trees such as Ceiba petandra and Cedrela. Los Katíos National Park, Colombia
  • Other interesting, unique or rare plants in the region are "guachipelín blanco" Myrospermum frutescens, brazilwood (Haematoxylon brasiletto), "tamarindo de monte" Lysiloma divaricatum, Cedrela odorata and Bombacopsis quinatum. Central American dry forests
  • By the 17th century, lumber operations had already begun to harvest the most sought-after woods including mahogany (probably Swietenia mahogani), cedar (Cedrela sp.), "palo brasil" (Haematoxylon sp.) and fustic (Chlorophora tinctoria). Cayos Miskitos-San Andrés and Providencia moist forests
  • Last century, many valuable timber species formed extensive jungles of tremendous tree size, but today are almost extirpated, among them were Swietenia macrophylla, Cedrela odorata, Caesalpinia ebenum, Cariniana pyriformis, Tabebuia chrysantha, Bombacopsis sp., Sinú Valley dry forests
  • Tropical cedar (Cedrela odorata) is threatened with local extinction along the rivers, particularly the lower Putumayo and its tributaries near the Colombian City of Tarapacá on the Caquetá, and on the Amazon near Leticia. Solimões-Japurá moist forest
  • Important timber trees growing in the reserve include Swietenia macrophylla, Callopyllum brasiliense, Carapa guianensis, Cedrela odorata, Tabebuia rosea and Virola koschnyi. Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, Honduras
  • By the 17th century, lumber operations had already begun to harvest the most sought-after woods including mahogany (probably Swietenia mahogani), cedar (Cedrela sp.), "palo brasil" (Haematoxylon sp.) and fustic (Chlorophora tinctoria). Cayos Miskitos-San Andrés and Providencia moist forests
  • Other interesting, unique or rare plants in the region are "guachipelín blanco" Myrospermum frutescens, brazilwood (Haematoxylon brasiletto), "tamarindo de monte" Lysiloma divaricatum, Cedrela odorata and Bombacopsis quinatum. Central American dry forests
  • Large-scale commercial logging has occurred on and around Marajó Island since the 1950s, all but replacing certain valuable native species: Virola surinamensis, Carapa guianensis, Cedrela odorata, Ceiba pentandra, and Maquira coreaceae. Marajó varzea
  • Achras sapota, Cedrela adorata, Rhedia edulis and Enterolobium cyclocarpum are common species; (b) Premontane Moist, which is very rich in species; (c) Premontane Rain with very rough topography; and (d) Lower Montane Rain where stands of Clusia spp. occur, sometimes mixed with a few other species (including palms). Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica

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