bewitchment

View Synonyms
NOUN
  1. a magical spell
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How To Use bewitchment In A Sentence

  • Many Malawians hold similar beliefs about the possibility of bewitchment, and we had heard numerous disturbing tales involving children and witchcraft from other clients in the clinic. Chi Mgbako: Aiding Children Accused of Witchcraft
  • Its prevalence is not the result of a recent word transfer or innovation, but reflects the preservation of an ancient verb root of persistent meaning that dates back to the proto-Bantu period of the early third millennium BCE. 56 In other words, the idea of bewitchment has retained its current meaning and linguistic form for at least 5,000 years. Societies, Religion, and History: Central East Tanzanians and the World They Created, c. 200 BCE to 1800 CE
  • Gillian Anderson's version of the duchess the former Wallis Warfield Simpson, begins as a bewitchment and ends like the strike of a rattlesnake. Where the Time Goes
  • Broadly speaking, the frequency of supposed bewitchments diminished; their scope was restricted to personal, not communal, misfortunes; socially, a narrower range of persons was involved.
  • What the local people saw as bewitchment he saw as mental stress. Spellbound
  • Magic spells, poisons, potions and enchantments may be frequent plot devices at the ballet, but the art form itself is under a bewitchment of its own making. Vitro Nasu » 2009 » May
  • When the lovely daughter tries to lay the blame for her own transgression on a bewitchment, Nell and her grandmother suffer terrible consequences from the frenzied folly of a superstitious community.
  • I will, sir, flatter my sworn brother, the people, to earn a dearer estimation of them; 'tis a condition they account gentle: and since the wisdom of their choice is rather to have my hat than my heart, I will practise the insinuating nod and be off to them most counterfeitly; that is, sir, I will counterfeit the bewitchment of some popular man and give it bountiful to the desirers. Coriolanus
  • I will, sir, flatter my sworn brother the people, to earn a dearer estimation of them; ¬ítis a condition they account gentle: and since the wisdom of their choice is rather to have my hat than my heart, I will practise the insinuating nod, and be off to them most counterfeitly; that is, sir, I will counterfeit the bewitchment of some popular man, and give it bountifully to the desirers. Act II. Scene III. Coriolanus
  • Perhaps the Others or some other being maintain a bewitchment on that place. THE GOLDEN FOOL: BOOK TWO OF THE TAWNY MAN
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