aphesis

NOUN
  1. the gradual disappearance of an initial (usually unstressed) vowel or syllable as in `squire' for `esquire'
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How To Use aphesis In A Sentence

  • There were other charges brought against Cocceius, however, one of which was his distinction between +aphesis hamartiôn+ and +paresis hamartiôn+, by which he held that the former was a complete pardon, but the latter incomplete, and only in force under the old dispensation. History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology
  • [38] But anesis and aphesis in I.Esd. iv. 62 looks like a word-play in what may not be original Greek; though a Semitic original of that section of I.Esd. (iii. 1 to v. 6) is by no means proved. The Three Additions to Daniel: A Study.
  • Testament was +paresis+ preparing the way for the complete +aphesis+ of the New. History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology
  • Would UK speakers think this a neologism, an example of aphesis and/or a local eccentricity?
  • The oratorio's text accordingly contained references to "breaking bonds asunder" and "casting away yokes," recalling the early Christian belief that the Messiah's reign would bring liberty (Hebrew deror or debt cancellation) and release (Greek aphesis) from debt bondage. Slugger O'Toole
  • Among phonetic changes which occur with more or less regularity are those called aphesis, epenthesis, epithesis, assimilation, dissimilation, and metathesis, convenient terms which are less learned than they appear. The Romance of Names
  • Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel a process called aphesis; it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”. Watch This: 44 Inch Chest Official Trailer with Ray Winstone « FirstShowing.net
  • (Hebrew deror or debt cancellation) and release (Greek aphesis) from debt bondage. GlobalResearch.ca
  • Among phonetic changes which occur with more or less regularity are those called aphesis, epenthesis, epithesis, assimilation, dissimilation, and metathesis, convenient terms which are less learned than they appear. The Romance of Names
  • But this transformation of the [Greek: aphesis hamartiôn] into [Greek: charis metanoias] plainly shews that Clement had merely taken over from tradition the special estimate of the death of Christ as procuring salvation; for it is meaningless to deduce the [Greek: charis metanoias] from the blood of Christ. History of Dogma, Volume 1 (of 7)
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