ain

[ UK /ˈe‍ɪn/ ]
ADJECTIVE
  1. belonging to or on behalf of a specified person (especially yourself); preceded by a possessive
    `ain' is Scottish
    do your own thing
    she makes her own clothes
    for your own use
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How To Use ain In A Sentence

  • In my view his confrontational, gladiatorial style has been a major contributor to the widespread disdain of the British public for politicians generally. Times, Sunday Times
  • Blackpool Scorpions notched their first away win of the season against a good attacking Leigh team.
  • She has certainly branched out into more interesting work in recent years.
  • I badly wanted the job, but knew that my age would probably tell against me.
  • When the King heard this, he bade his son be slain; but on the next day the second Wazir came forward for intercession and kissed ground in prostration. The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night
  • Their dried dung is found everywhere, and is in many places the only fuel afforded by the plains; their skulls, which last longer than any other part of the animal, are among the most familiar of objects to the plainsman; their bones are in many districts so plentiful that it has become a regular industry, followed by hundreds of men (christened "bone hunters" by the frontiersmen), to go out with wagons and collect them in great numbers for the sake of the phosphates they yield; and Bad Lands, plateaus, and prairies alike, are cut up in all directions by the deep ruts which were formerly buffalo trails. VIII. The Lordly Buffalo
  • Watching celebs suffer from hunger and lack of home comforts is somehow really entertaining. The Sun
  • Several selections contain strings of double notes, primarily thirds and sixths.
  • He specialized in moonlit and winter scenes, usually including a sheet of water and sometimes also involving the light of a fire, and he also painted sunsets and views at dawn or twilight.
  • Moreover, she is being asked to do this while remaining scrupulously impartial and keeping the viewer entertained with talk of trade deals, tariffs and employment figures. Times, Sunday Times
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