accusative case

NOUN
  1. the case of nouns serving as the direct object of a verb
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How To Use accusative case In A Sentence

  • But given that it is the same in nominative and accusative cases, just like a noun, it is a little surprising that it‘s possessive is a special case, especially since its and it’s sound identical. 2007 September « Motivated Grammar
  • However, when studying German I was taught some grammar: so I thus learned the difference between a past tense and a past participle, and the difference between the nominative and the accusative cases.
  • In addition, accusative case on who does not typically survive when the word is shunted to the beginning of an interrogative or relative clause.
  • This is called the accusative ending; and the word to which it is attached is said to be in the "accusative case": A Complete Grammar of Esperanto
  • So long as the payoff phrase is not actually a subject (even though it's interpreted as the subject), the basic case rule would predict accusative case.
  • I suspect that if one wanted to say "A gift was given by Aranth to Uni," it would simply be translated as Fler turce Arnθ Unial where the "agentive" function is taken up by a combination of the nomino-accusative case and marked word order. Ipa ama hen
  • In addition, accusative case on who does not typically survive when the word is shunted to the beginning of an interrogative or relative clause.
  • Thus in Czech, liquids are treated as moraic and both syllables show normal sonority peaks headed by the most sonorant phoneme of the group (i.e. s PIE *ḱunós 'of the dog') can only be a declined noun based on its form (because of its zerograded root *kun-) and at this stage, no derivative of "dog" can start with *kun- in the nominative or accusative cases either. Pre-IE Syncope has an easter-egg surprise for you
  • In ordinary English this is a function that goes with accusative case on a pronoun: if you knock on my door and I call out Who is it?
  • Most transitive verbs govern the accusative case in German.
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