Abkhazia

[ US /æbˈkæzjə, æbˈkɑzjə/ ]
NOUN
  1. an autonomous province of Georgia on the Black Sea; a strong independence movement has resulted in much instability
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How To Use Abkhazia In A Sentence

  • The Russians will almost certainly set up client states in Abkhazia and South Ossetia (and possibly Adjara — that’s in southern Georgia, watch out for that name in the news) and use the ’sensitive situation’ there as an excuse to shift all their military service exercises ever closer to the Georgian border. Archive 2008-08-01
  • Witnesses say Russian troops remain entrenched deep in Georgian territory, away from the Abkhazian and South Ossetian borders, and that they still surround the key city of Gori.
  • Abkhazian leaders have also proposed a law allowing Russians to purchase houses in Abkhazia on the same terms as Abkhazian citizens. 2010 February « The View From LL2
  • It's got not one, but two love triangles: Thomas, a therapist, falls in love with a married attorney at the same time that Anna, one of his married patients, is smitten by a writer working on a novel called "Abkhazian Dominoes. Five books for Valentine's Day
  • NATO will not drop bombs for ten weeks to save Georgians from ethnic cleansing in Abkhazia, the way it bombed to save Albanians in Kosovo. Where Europe Vanishes « Isegoria
  • “Kitsmarishvili [said] that the top leadership of Georgia was preparing for a military operation in Abkhazia in spring 2008, which were brought by instructors from Israel, …” Medvedev’s ‘Tough Guy Act’ « Antiwar.com Blog
  • But the biggest investor of all is Prime Minister Putin, who visited Abkhazia last summer for the war's first anniversary, and pledged $500 million in state aid to strengthen Abkhaz defense.
  • From here, by arrangement with the Georgian government, Gelayev's fighters set out to assist in reconquering Abkhazia and to open up a second front against Russia.
  • Kartvelian and North Caucasian languages - such as Abkhazian - are quite separate and not mutually comprehensible. London Review of Books
  • Currently, Abkhazian delegates are visiting foreign countries throughout South American, attempting to establish diplomatic ties with and, more importantly, receive recognition from nations there: 2010 February « The View From LL2
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