yoke vs yolk

yoke yolk

Definitions

  • 1) Something that connects or joins together; a bond or tie.
  • 2) A frame designed to be carried across a person's shoulders with equal loads suspended from each end.
  • 3) The condition of being subjugated by or as if by a conqueror; subjugation or bondage.
  • 4) A piece of a garment that is closely fitted, either around the neck and shoulders or at the hips, and from which an unfitted or gathered part of the garment is hung.
  • 5) A pair of draft animals, such as oxen, joined by a yoke.
  • 6) Nautical A crossbar on a ship's rudder to which the steering cables are connected.
  • 7) A clamp or vise that holds a machine part in place or controls its movement or that holds two such parts together.
  • 8) Electronics A series of two or more magnetic recording heads fastened securely together for playing or recording on more than one track simultaneously.
  • 9) A contoured crossbar having two U-shaped attachments that fit around the necks of a team of oxen or other draft animals, with a central ring for hitching the team to a cart, plow, or other load.
  • 10) Any of various emblems of subjugation, such as a structure made of two upright spears with a third laid across them, under which conquered enemies of ancient Rome were forced to march in subjection.
  • 11) A bar used with a double harness to connect the collar of each horse to the pole of a wagon or coach.
  • 12) In a grain-elevator, the head-frame or top of the elevator, where the elevator-belt or lifter passes over the upper drum, and where the cups discharge into the shoot.
  • 13) A carriage-clip for uniting two parts of the running-gear.
  • 14) A cross-bar or curved piece from which a large bell is suspended for ringing.
  • 15) As much land as may be plowed by a pair of oxen in a day; hence, as much work generally as is done at a stretch; also, a part of the working-day, as from meal-time to meal-time, in which labor is carried on without interruption. Compare yokelet.
  • 16) A double journal-bearing having two journals united by bars or rods, that pass on each side of the pulley, the shafting being supported by both journals: used in some forms of dynamos to carry the armature; a yoke-arbor.
  • 17) A frame of wood attached to the neck of an animal to prevent it from creeping under a fence or gate, or from jumping over a fence.
  • 18) Hence, something resembling this apparatus in form or use.
  • 19) A pair; couple; brace: said of things united by some link, especially of draft-animals: very rarely of persons, in contempt.
  • 20) A pair of iron clamps of semicircular shape, with a cross screw and nut at each end for tightening them around heavy pipes or other objects, for attaching the ropes when hoisting or lowering into position by power.
  • 21) Nautical, a bar attached to the rudder-head, and projecting in each direction sidewise. To the ends are attached the yoke-ropes or yoke-lines, which are pulled by the steersman in rowboats, or pass to the drum on the axis of the steering-wheel in larger craft.
  • 22) (I) In an electromagnet consisting of two parallel cores joined across one pair of ends to form a U- or horseshoe-shaped magnet, the cross-bar joining the ends is called the yoke of the magnet.
  • 23) A dialectal variant of yox, yex. Also yolk.
  • 24) A contrivance of great antiquity, by which a pair of draft-animals, particularly oxen, are fastened together, usually consisting of a piece of timber, hollowed or made curving near each end, and fitted with bows for receiving the necks of the animals.
  • 25) In wheelwrighting, the overlap tire-bolt washer used at the joints of the fellies.
  • 26) In carpentry, the cross-piece at the head of a wooden window-frame, which forms the head of a window as the sill forms the foot. Compare head-sill.
  • 27) Something which couples, connects, or binds together; a bond of connection; a link; a tie.
  • 28) A kind of band or supporting piece to which are fastened the plaited, gathered, or otherwise falling and depending parts of a garment, and which by its shape causes these parts to hang in a certain way: as, the yoke of a shirt, which is a double piece of stuff carried around the neck and over the shoulders, and from which the whole body of the shirt hangs; the yoke of a skirt, which supports the fullness from the hips downward.
  • 29) An emblem, token, or mark of servitude, slavery, and sometimes of suffering generally.
  • 30) Synonyms Brace, etc. See pair.
  • 31) A chain or ridge of hills; also, a single hill in a chain: obsolete, but still retained in some place-names: as, Troutbeck Yoke.
  • 32) A branch-pipe, or a two-way coupling for pipes, particularly twin hot- and cold-water pipes that unite in their discharge.
  • 33) Toputayokeon.
  • 34) To harness a draft animal to.
  • 35) To fit or join with a yoke.
  • 36) To force into heavy labor, bondage, or subjugation.
  • 37) To join together; bind.
  • 38) To become joined.
  • 39) To harness (a draft animal) to a vehicle or an implement.
  • 40) To be joined or associated; to be intimately connected; to consort closely; to mate.
  • 41) To put a yoke on; to join in or with a yoke.
  • 42) To couple; to join with another.

Definitions

  • 1) The yellow, spherical part of an egg that is surrounded by the white albumen, and serves as nutriment for the growing young.
  • 2) This portion of the egg of a bird, especially a chicken, which is large, yellow, and surrounded by albumen.
  • 3) The portion of the egg of egg-laying vertebrates, such as reptiles and birds, and of certain invertebrates that consists chiefly of protein and fat and serves as the primary source of nourishment for the early embryo.
  • 4) A greasy substance found in unprocessed sheep's wool, which is refined to make lanolin.
  • 5) (Zoöl.) a slender cord or duct which connects the yolk glands with the egg chambers in certain insects, as in the aphids.
  • 6) The yellow part of an egg; the vitellus.
  • 7) (Anat.) the umbilical vesicle. See under Unbilical.
  • 8) (Zoöl.) a special organ which secretes the yolk of the eggs in many turbellarians, and in some other invertebrates. See Illust. of Hermaphrodite in Appendix.
  • 9) (Zoöl.) An oily secretion which naturally covers the wool of sheep.
  • 10) nutritive material of an ovum stored for the nutrition of an embryo (especially the yellow mass of a bird or reptile egg)
  • 11) the yellow spherical part of an egg that is surrounded by the albumen
  • 12) The greasy sebaceous secretion or unctuous substance from the skin of the sheep, which renders the fleece soft and pliable; wool-oil.
  • 13) The yellow and principal substance of an egg, as distinguished from the white; that protoplasmic content of the ovum of any animal which forms the embryo in germination, with or without some additional substance which serves to nourish the embryo during its formation, as distinguished from a mass of albumen which may surround it, and from the egg-pod or shell which incloses the whole; the vitellus, whether formative wholly or in part.
  • 14) The vitellus, a part of the seed of plants, so named from its supposed analogy with the yolk of an egg.
  • 15) Seeyoke.

Examples

  • 1) It was a wooden contraption that they would put on one animal and yoke him to another.
  • 2) The difficulty rarely lies in any unwillingness to yoke these two things together.
  • 3) I'm not sure that it helps to yoke these two different regions into a single fund.
  • 4) _Let as many servants as are under the yoke count their own masters worthy of all honor_, &c. The word here rendered _servants_ means SLAVES, converted to the Christian faith; and the word rendered _yoke_ signifies the _state of slavery_ in which
  • 5) Yoga is a Sanskrit word meaning union, from which the English word yoke is derived.
  • 6) Your will was strong, but my grandfather's trust which you accepted and did not fulfill -- what you call his yoke -- is the expression of something stronger, with deeper, farther-spreading roots, knit into the foundations of sacredness for all men.
  • 7) From the same source comes the English word "yoke," with a similar meaning.
  • 8) For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. close window
  • 9) Sure, it's a sufferin 'yoke-eh-me-bob, but yer aul Granny knows it's the rale ally-daly, la la.
  • 10) El Barzon (the yoke) takes it's name from the revolutionary saying, "the yoke is broken, but the ox goes on".
  • 11) But if we give a comprehensive glance to the moral progress of society, we shall see that little by little, the yoke is being made easier, in other words, we shall see that nature, or life, moves gradually toward triumph.
  • 12) ‘The god told him that he would meet a cow that had never borne the weight of a yoke or plough.’
  • 13) ‘The only noise was the snorting of oxen as they pulled against the yoke.’
  • 14) ‘The yoke was fastened to the pole with a complex of knots so thoroughly tangled that it was impossible to unravel.’
  • 15) ‘She saw herself bound to her routine like a bullock to its yoke.’
  • 16) ‘The yearning of the poor that the Independence of the country and the shedding of the yoke of an oppressive colonial past would bring wealth or at least a little more prosperity to them, still remain an unfulfilled dream.’
  • 17) ‘The worst abuses were officially abolished, but the yoke of oppression did return, and new laws depriving people of their freedom and their political rights were instituted.’
  • 18) ‘Artistic approach to the style has been undergoing modern transformation, emerging out from under the oppressive yoke of postmodernist theory.’
  • 19) ‘We're free from the yoke of oppression.’
  • 20) ‘Most of us choose to live under the yoke of economic oppression.’
  • 21) ‘The gang tries to throw off the yoke of racist oppression and control their own destinies.’
  • 22) ‘These reforms were intended to free the common man to pursue business opportunities without the oppressive yoke of high interest rates or excessive rents.’
  • 23) ‘This could be the catalyst needed for the revolution of the common people of the world to unite and throw off the yoke of government oppression.’
  • 24) ‘This is a time full of lessons for those who day to day languish under the oppressive yoke of capitalism.’
  • 25) ‘It's a triumphant moment of humanity unwilling to bow under the yoke of oppression.’
  • 26) ‘The term is an antiquated yoke of oppression, politically, culturally and socially.’
  • 27) ‘To those of us who have resented the yoke of parental tyranny, that doesn't sound so bad.’
  • 28) ‘The crippling yoke of oppression has been dropped on the American neck.’
  • 29) ‘Fifty three years ago India shook off the yoke of British imperialism and became independent.’
  • 30) ‘If it brings about democratic progress, why is it a bad thing for people to throw off the yoke of tyranny and decide that they want to control their own futures?’
  • 31) ‘They have been released from the yoke of authoritarian tyranny.’
  • 32) ‘Two hundred years ago, following a slave uprising, Haiti threw off the yoke of bondage to become a free black state and a haven for escaped African slaves.’
  • 33) ‘Sure, they may have chafed under the yoke of being Jimi's ‘sidemen’, but he simply never had any better.’
  • 34) ‘Once the yoke of bondage was removed, we reached out through a network of World Trade Centers in 91 countries and 200 cities, all part of the World Trade Centers Assn.’
  • 35) ‘Experiment with this technique on shirt yokes and sleeve seams.’
  • 36) ‘It has the right yoke, waistband and pocket details.’
  • 37) ‘Foam usually isn't recommended for use on lightweight fabrics; however, it can be used in the yoke or neckline area of form-fitting garments.’
  • 38) ‘Eliminate the collar and finish the neckline edge with the yoke lining according to the pattern guidesheet.’
  • 39) ‘Using elements as disparate as an overscale man's shirt minus collar, gathered and sheared yokes on coats, and asymmetrical accordion pleats, she created a collection as elegant as it was personal.’
  • 40) ‘It features a sueded finish, tailored collar with top button loop, a left chest pocket, and a double layer back yoke with extended shoulders.’
  • 41) ‘He doesn't own any shiny suits with Western yokes in the back.’
  • 42) ‘The Pies wore white guernseys with a black yoke, with black and white striped socks, while Swan Districts wore their traditional black and white stripes.’
  • 43) ‘The club wore green guernseys with a red yoke, which was also distinctive.’
  • 44) ‘Consider embroidering little trains or sailboats on overalls, or teddy bears or bunnies on the yoke of a dress.’
  • 45) ‘Teresa was wearing a simple gown of emerald green with a white yoke and a black bow just below her throat.’
  • 46) ‘We turn the control yoke just a little toward the wind and the aileron comes up a little.’
  • 47) ‘It still had sticks, rather than control yokes, and got most of its performance out of its light weight.’
  • 48) ‘The control yoke must be held fully rearward to maintain the stall.’
  • 49) ‘Kelsey fought to maintain control with the yoke that was trying to shake itself out of his hands.’
  • 50) ‘Keep the yoke or stick full aft to minimize weight on the nosewheel.’
  • 51) ‘The more tightly you grip the yoke, the greater the tendency to make unintended inputs.’
  • 52) ‘Use rudders for heading control and only small jabs of the yoke to correct pitch and bank excursions.’
  • 53) ‘That part of the preflight where we bring the yoke all the way back just isn't happening.’
  • 54) ‘My feet and hands moved automatically, working the strafing pedals and the control yoke.’
  • 55) ‘The engines were run up to 2500 rpm with the yokes held hard back and both men clinging to the bucking columns.’
  • 56) ‘Not only do many pilots find the small stick to be more comfortable and ergonomic, but the lack of a standard yoke frees up all the space in front of the pilot for an unobstructed view of the instruments.’
  • 57) ‘Zeke clutched the yoke and throttle, while Jeff calibrated the weapons arrays.’
  • 58) ‘Gilkie found the yoke wildly bucking as he attempted to hold on to the controls.’
  • 59) ‘He turned his yoke to the right to try to bring the left wing up but received no response.’
  • 60) ‘Get the yoke back and either ride it out or add power and fly out of it.’
  • 61) ‘Oxen are yoked to the plough, donkeys carry the harvest from field to village, and cows and sheep trample the grain on the threshing floor.’
  • 62) ‘Because Cassius is yoked to him both in love and their deadly and momentous endeavour, he is a tragic hero too, powerless against the unbending resolve of Brutus to do what philosophy, not opportunity, dictates.’
  • 63) ‘The two cannot go together, and is akin to yoking a horse and a camel together.’
  • 64) ‘Mismatched yet yoked together, they make a striking pair.’
  • 65) ‘The drover had set about yoking the oxen.’
  • 66) ‘True pastors will caution their beloved children in the gospel, not to be unequally yoked.’
  • 67) ‘Privatization is an economic tool inexorably yoked to politics.’
  • 68) ‘The second thing to consider is the very nature of the discipleship yoked upon God's people in Christ.’
  • 69) ‘Somehow, she had full multimedia elements, which she had yoked together in just a few days.’
  • 70) ‘The Warsaw Pact was part of a bigger imperial arrangement for yoking the East European armies to the Soviet high command.’
  • 71) ‘The occurrence of each forceful or aggressive behavior was then yoked to an appropriate response by the woman.’
  • 72) ‘His montage was designed around the yoking of disparate objects.’
  • 73) ‘Individual senators have little or no incentive to yoke themselves together to advance the national interest.’
  • 74) ‘I think in the end my concerns of "unequal yoking" would have outweighed the free publicity such a venture generates.’
  • 75) ‘I wondered how they yoked a team of horses.’
  • 76) ‘Once agreement was obtained, two yoked control subjects were selected from the same school the dropout had attended.’
  • 77) ‘The slender stories yoked together had the feel of upmarket fanzine writing.’
  • 78) ‘History is yoked with an amazing skill to personal lives.’
  • 79) ‘A virtual initiation rite in postwar Italy, this is Domenico's chance to yoke himself to secure, predictable manhood.’
  • 80) ‘Their families are left reeling, forever yoked to this grotesque event.’
  • 81) ‘Unfortunately, it is not always, or even usually, possible to yoke self-interest into such a self-enforcing mechanism to promote moral ideals.’
  • 82) ‘Treasures in those lineages need to he safeguarded against the breakdown of the old cosmologies with which they were yoked.’
  • 83) ‘Yet, in this instance, women evidently yoked custom to modernity in order to circumvent a Christian prohibition.’
  • 84) ‘Limited government is a cornerstone of America's political institutions and is tightly yoked to the country's founding ideology.’
  • 85) ‘These two are modern day people with a modern day love that is yoked to older traditions they do not feel a part of.’

Examples

  • 1) The larger yolks of duck eggs help to enrich this salad.
  • 2) The residual heat will thicken the egg yolk sauce to become thick and velvety.
  • 3) Paint the risen sides with egg yolk.
  • 4) Or you get fried eggs with solid yolks.
  • 5) Cover and cook the eggs until the yolks are just set.
  • 6) Add the vanilla and egg yolk and whizz.
  • 7) Beat the remaining egg yolk with a pinch of salt and brush the edges of the pie with it.
  • 8) Add egg yolks, reserving the whites in a second mixing bowl.
  • 9) The yolks come from free-range hens, too.
  • 10) Add the egg yolks, mustard, lemon juice and a teaspoon of salt.
  • 11) Place the yolks in a medium bowl and stir in the caster sugar.
  • 12) Place the egg yolk and mustard in a bowl and whisk together.
  • 13) They had gone dark round the edges with a yellow yolk in the middle.
  • 14) Beat together the whole eggs and egg yolks in a large bowl.
  • 15) Place the whites in a large mixing bowl and add the yolks to the white sauce mixture.
  • 16) Put the yolks in a mixing bowl that fits snugly over the saucepan.
  • 17) Whisk the egg yolks and sugar until the mixture turns pale and thickens.
  • 18) Melt butter in pan and slowly add to yolks with motor running.
  • 19) Put the egg yolks in a mixing bowl and whisk in the anchovy paste.
  • 20) Top each portion with a raw egg yolk.
  • 21) Beat two eggs and one egg yolk and add cream and milk.
  • 22) Put the egg yolks and sugar in a heatproof mixing bowl and beat together until pale.
  • 23) Remove from the heat and stir in the egg yolks.
  • 24) Put the egg yolks in a large bowl and whisk until they begin to go a bit lighter in colour.
  • 25) Put into a small bowl and mix with the egg yolks, mustard and vinegar.
  • 26) But egg yolk is yellow, revolting.
  • 27) Place egg yolks, mustard and seasoning of salt and pepper in a mixing bowl.
  • 28) Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks in a large bowl then whisk in the cream mixture.
  • 29) Place egg yolk, mustard and vinegar in clean bowl.
  • 30) ‘These new noodles substitute soy flour for semolina flour and may contain egg whites or yolks to boost protein.’
  • 31) ‘Whole egg protein contains yolks and whites, providing a high ratio of indispensable amino acids.’
  • 32) ‘Fold the egg whites into the egg yolk and sugar mixture.’
  • 33) ‘When the whites congeal, just spoon some water over the yellow yolks and the albumen will turn white, and you have your runny eggs.’
  • 34) ‘The preserved eggs, with their green-and-yellow yolks and amber whites, cut into segments and arranged around a pile of chopped green peppers like the petals of a flower.’
  • 35) ‘In bowl, whisk together sugar and yolks until light yellow and foamy.’
  • 36) ‘To make the custard, separate the eggs and whisk the vanilla sugar into the yolks (save the whites for meringues).’
  • 37) ‘Put the rind, juice, yolks and sugar in a small basin and place over a pan of boiling water.’
  • 38) ‘Mix egg yolk and lemon juice, add to flour mixture, and mix to a stiff dough’
  • 39) ‘Mix the egg yolk, milk, sugar and potato flour together in a small saucepan.’
  • 40) ‘You may be used to eating the whites and discarding the yolks, but skip that step during pregnancy because the yolks provide extra calories, Vitamin D and folic acid.’
  • 41) ‘The yolks were homogenized with 1 ml water per gram of yolk.’
  • 42) ‘Use hands to slowly incorporate yolks into potato and flour mixture.’
  • 43) ‘Gently drizzle vinegar over yolks and sprinkle sugar and salt on top.’
  • 44) ‘Cool and peel eggs, reserving yolks and discarding whites.’
  • 45) ‘Separate egg whites and yolks into separate bowls.’
  • 46) ‘The eggs were then cracked open, and the yolks and whites of the egg samples from the same batch were pooled and homogenized with an electric mixer.’
  • 47) ‘Leftover raw egg whites and yolks should be put in airtight containers and refrigerated immediately, then used within a day or two.’
  • 48) ‘Fresh eggs from free-range chickens will produce a stronger binder because of the rich, viscous yolks.’
  • 49) ‘Gradually pour half of hot milk mixture over yolks while whisking constantly.’
  • 50) ‘In contrast to the fluid yolk of atherinomorphs, yolk is organized into globules in other taxa.’
  • 51) ‘An estimate of the daily amount of yolk deposited on developing ova and the sequence of laying are important when evaluating the total cost of egg production.’
  • 52) ‘In this study, we investigated differences in maternally deposited yolk testosterone and DHT in relation to diet quality.’
  • 53) ‘For example, yolk was present in male blood plasma, which is highly abnormal.’
  • 54) ‘Fleischer used gel electrophoresis to discriminate yolk allozymes sampled from eggs laid by several female cowbirds.’
0

Use Linguix everywhere you write

Be productive and efficient, no matter where and what you write!

Linguix Apps

Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy