practice vs practise

practice practise

Definitions

  • 1) The act or process of doing something; performance or action.
  • 2) A trick, scheme, or intrigue.
  • 3) The business of a professional person.
  • 4) A habitual or customary action or way of doing something.
  • 5) Law The procedure for trial of cases in a court of law, usually specified by rules.
  • 6) The act of tricking or scheming, especially with malicious intent.
  • 7) A session of preparation or performance undertaken to acquire or polish a skill.
  • 8) A habitual or customary action or act.
  • 9) Exercise of an occupation or profession.
  • 10) Repeated performance of an activity in order to learn or perfect a skill.
  • 11) The condition of being skilled through repeated exercise.
  • 12) Archaic The skill so learned or perfected.
  • 13) Customary or constant use; state of being used.
  • 14) Frequently repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of a similar kind; usage; habit; custom
  • 15) The form and manner of conducting legal proceedings, whether at law, or in equity, or in criminal procedure, according to the principles of law and the rules of the court; those legal rules which direct the course of proceeding to bring parties into court, and the course of the court after they are brought in. Bishop.
  • 16) The regular pursuit of some employment or business; the exercise of a profession; hence, the business of a practitioner: as, to dispose of one's practice; a physician in lucrative practice.
  • 17) The state of being used; customary use; actual application.
  • 18) Skill acquired through use; experience; dexterity.
  • 19) Exercise for instruction or discipline; training; drill: as, practice makes perfect.
  • 20) Hence, in possession of (or lacking) that skill or facility which comes from the continuous exercise of bodily or mental power.
  • 21) In arithmetic, a rule for expeditiously solving questions in proportion, or rather for abridging the operation of multiplying quantities expressed in different denominations, as when it is required to find the value of a number of articles at so many pounds, shillings, and pence each.
  • 22) Synonyms Habit, Usage, etc. See custom.
  • 23) Action; exercise; performance; the process of accomplishing or carrying out; performance or execution as opposed to speculation or theory.
  • 24) An action; act; proceeding; doing: in the plural, generally in a bad sense.
  • 25) Practice, Experience. Practice is sometimes erroneously used for experience, which is a much broader word. Practice is the repetition of an act: as, to become a skilled marksman by practice. Experience is, by derivation, a going clear through, and may mean action, but much oftener views the person as acted upon, taught, disciplined, by what befalls him.
  • 26) Frequent or customary performance; habit; usage; custom.
  • 27) Artifice; treachery; a plot; a stratagem.
  • 28) Seepractise.
  • 29) To do or perform (something) repeatedly in order to acquire or polish a skill.
  • 30) To carry out in action; observe.
  • 31) To give lessons or repeated instructions to; drill.
  • 32) To work at a profession.
  • 33) Obsolete To plot (something evil).
  • 34) Archaic To intrigue or plot.
  • 35) To work at, especially as a profession.
  • 36) To do or perform habitually or customarily; make a habit of.
  • 37) To do something repeatedly in order to acquire or polish a skill.
  • 38) To do or perform something habitually or repeatedly.
  • 39) To apply theoretical science or knowledge, esp. by way of experiment; to exercise or pursue an employment or profession, esp. that of medicine or of law.
  • 40) To learn by practice; to form a habit.
  • 41) To perform certain acts frequently or customarily, either for instruction, profit, or amusement
  • 42) To try artifices or stratagems.
  • 43) To teach or accustom by practice; to train.
  • 44) obsolete To make use of; to employ.
  • 45) To put into practice; to carry out; to act upon; to commit; to execute; to do.
  • 46) To exercise, or follow, as a profession, trade, art, etc., .
  • 47) To exercise one's self in, for instruction or improvement, or to acquire discipline or dexterity
  • 48) To do or perform frequently, customarily, or habitually; to make a practice of.

Definitions

  • 1) transitive, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland To pursue (a career, especially law, fine art or medicine).
  • 2) transitive, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland To perform or observe in a habitual fashion.
  • 3) Alternative spelling of practice ().
  • 4) intransitive, obsolete, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland To conspire.
  • 5) transitive, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland To repeat as a way of improving one's skill in that activity.
  • 6) intransitive, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland To repeat an activity in this way.
  • 7) See practice.
  • 8) carry out or practice; as of jobs and professions
  • 9) learn by repetition
  • 10) Toexperiment.

Examples

  • 1) We do this as part of our business practices when needed.
  • 2) Unite said the arrangement was a normal practice within the union movement.
  • 3) It has two doctors but other practices with the same number offer a third more hours.
  • 4) Such a practice is already common in rugby.
  • 5) We are trying to put into practice what we think will be good for them.
  • 6) The government will consider introducing a new law banning the practice.
  • 7) The change in practice means that investigations into nurses and midwives will be dealt with differently to those made against doctors.
  • 8) Some people thought three hours' practice a day was a lot.
  • 9) In this case she was acting in accordance with established practice.
  • 10) Extra slip catching practice is necessary for reaction and positional reasons.
  • 11) Accounts are also important because they encourage wholesome business practice.
  • 12) They may be unaware that this practice is illegal.
  • 13) This is not something that is part of medical practice.
  • 14) Worked the players hard in fielding practice but made no bones that his team need to improve.
  • 15) The following attitudes and practices will help you do this.
  • 16) Your football practice is important and keeps you fit.
  • 17) We have changed our practice as a result of deaths.
  • 18) They did so only because that reflects law and practice.
  • 19) How does the marginal gains method work in practice?
  • 20) They have all been caused by the irrational and poor business practices of the banks.
  • 21) Any doctor in practice could have told them that.
  • 22) Few of us receive enough of it, and few of us regularly practice giving it away.
  • 23) Was this an established practice bequeathed to him by his predecessors when he took the job in 2005?
  • 24) To them because no other people can lead the world into the good practices necessary to realise the potential benefits of all this change.
  • 25) It is so little opposed to practice, that it is nothing but _practice explained_.
  • 26) Again practice, practice, practice is what it takes to be proficient.
  • 27) The most obvious weakness of such techniques in practice is the worry that the auction house, which earns a revenue proportional to gross auction receipts, will use the information to push up prices by inserting fake bidders.
  • 28) What this turns into in practice is TV ads about how Senator Joe Szilagyi voted to kill innocent puppies.
  • 29) Watching what those guys do in practice is pretty impressive.
  • 30) – What this does in practice is it lets the House take an action that allows the Senate bill to become law with no guarantee that the “fixes” that they vote for will also become law.
  • 31) Portis did say that his workload this week in practice is similar to last week.
  • 32) What this does in practice is it lets the House take an action that allows the Senate bill to become law with no guarantee that the “fixes” that they vote for will also become law.
  • 33) Actually, abortion in practice is almost always a back up contraception method.
  • 34) ‘Unfortunately, it often appears that she is unable to get her free-market ideas put into practice.’
  • 35) ‘The idea was put into practice last year but it was not until this term that it really took off.’
  • 36) ‘However, Elliott warns that it still needs to be evaluated before the theory is put into practice.’
  • 37) ‘In the challenge of his new role he found an opportunity to put into practice theories which had long been forming in his mind.’
  • 38) ‘Army leaders at all levels should renew efforts to reduce the gap between stated beliefs and actual practice.’
  • 39) ‘We must again be aware of the gap between ideas and actual practice.’
  • 40) ‘There is no fancy stuff here; just straight accounting theory put into practice.’
  • 41) ‘It sounds like a good idea but theory and practice can be very different, as we have seen all too often before in this industry.’
  • 42) ‘He said some recommendations had been put into practice while others were being implemented.’
  • 43) ‘Not only are they divisive, but they might actually either have to be put into practice, or they might have to be changed.’
  • 44) ‘The third stage is actually to put into practice what we have heard and what we have contemplated.’
  • 45) ‘Each camp featured league play in two divisions, where the campers put into practice what they had learned throughout the week.’
  • 46) ‘How is he able to put into practice what he preached?’
  • 47) ‘As for the possibility of these suggestions being put into practice, that stage has not yet been reached.’
  • 48) ‘However, when lessons are learned in the abstract they are not as valuable as when put into practice, as we learned the very next day.’
  • 49) ‘This is something that is far easier to state than to put into practice.’
  • 50) ‘They worked hard, ran hard and trained hard, all the time trying to put into practice what their coaches were telling them.’
  • 51) ‘The importance of this book lies in the fact that its author is concerned not just with ideas, but with actual practice.’
  • 52) ‘In practice, most are expected to be set up as master trusts.’
  • 53) ‘How does our habitual practice of everyday eugenics shape our view of the world and of creation?’
  • 54) ‘Once doctors entered practice, the profession was personally remunerative as well.’
  • 55) ‘The expansion of medical practice into the regulation of behaviour carries doctors beyond their sphere of expertise and competence.’
  • 56) ‘He figured he could always incorporate his flair for comedy into his practice as doctor.’
  • 57) ‘Consideration should be given to removing the doctor from practice in such cases.’
  • 58) ‘The motives of the doctor and the wider context of medical practice just aren't relevant.’
  • 59) ‘I believe the most challenging aspect of all forms of medical practice is the need for, and the exercise of, judgment.’
  • 60) ‘This problem will permeate every aspect of medical research and practice in the future.’
  • 61) ‘He is a barrister and solicitor of this court, and he carries on the practice of his profession at the City of London.’
  • 62) ‘We documented the preferences of a range of patients within one hospital, with the aim of informing doctors' practice.’
  • 63) ‘Once there the family found accommodation in Hindley Street where the doctor set up practice.’
  • 64) ‘At present, the list of colleges where doctors can qualify to practice is legislated under the Health Insurance Act.’
  • 65) ‘Because of her focus on him, in her assessment of contemporary medical practice, she identifies the wrong problem.’
  • 66) ‘It accords completely with the constitutional requirements met by most of medical practice.’
  • 67) ‘The urge to bring down the edifice of medical practice seems to me to indicate the extent to which our expectations have been brought down already.’
  • 68) ‘Suffice it to say that this has not been my experience of the last 15 years of medical practice.’
  • 69) ‘But the main thrust of correspondence focused on the future of a particular medical practice.’
  • 70) ‘In good medical practice, the intention is to maximise the quality of life experienced by the patient.’
  • 71) ‘In a statement he admitted he plans to return to medical practice.’
  • 72) ‘After publication, he decided to leave anatomical research to take up medical practice.’
  • 73) ‘Until recently English courts have generally adopted the standard of accepted medical practice.’
  • 74) ‘Of course, some are plagued by such problems due to family difficulties, but, according to a survey among doctors' practices, many are there simply because they are over-burdened.’
  • 75) ‘Both I, and my sister's family, attend husband-and-wife doctors' practices.’
  • 76) ‘A trail-blazing super care centre that would move three doctors' practices and a clinic to one site is a backwards step, health bosses were told.’
  • 77) ‘It will call for improved career structures to be put in place to attract doctors to rural practices and for them to be given support to keep them in their jobs.’
  • 78) ‘But doctors claim many practices have been forced to change their booking systems to meet the targets.’
  • 79) ‘When and if you intend to foist 3,580 patients on to doctors in other practices, what will their reaction be?’
  • 80) ‘Qualitative data showed that patients generally supported the teaching of student doctors in their practice.’
  • 81) ‘Missed appointments at one doctors' practice in Keighley are costing £60,000 a year in wasted time.’
  • 82) ‘The doctor's practice in Settle has about 9,000 registered patients so we can't afford to be complacent.’
  • 83) ‘And just like a doctors' practice, police hope the surgeries will prevent problems before they happen.’
  • 84) ‘I have never been satisfied with this doctor's practice in the three years I have been there, and I really do intend to move.’
  • 85) ‘Our current building is the size now allowed for a two doctor, 4,000 patient practice, and clearly cannot cope.’
  • 86) ‘The only doctors' practice in Westbury is pressing ahead with plans to create three separate surgeries in the area.’
  • 87) ‘While the name of only one doctor may appear on the contract, there may be other doctors sharing his practice.’
  • 88) ‘When he was deputy governor he still ran his doctor's practice.’
  • 89) ‘Her reputation as a hardworking lawyer saw her practice grow, making her one of the five leading attorneys in Houston.’
  • 90) ‘A self-contained extension to the rear previously served as a doctor's practice.’
  • 91) ‘He sold his house to keep his medical practice going while he was away.’
  • 92) ‘He has now stopped his medical practice and is making use of his literary prowess to pen down useful material that is of some value to society.’
  • 93) ‘Two of the groups consisted of doctors from different practices and one group comprised doctors from one practice.’
  • 94) ‘It is expected to identify practices, procedures, and guidelines that will aid faculties in developing students to their maximum potential.’
  • 95) ‘Woodrow Wilson instituted the modern practice of delivering it to congress in person.’
  • 96) ‘The practice is expected to put huge strain on the state health budget.’
  • 97) ‘It's common practice for Hollywood to remake an old movie, but today's news must be some kind of record.’
  • 98) ‘The businessmen also felt uncertain about the government's capability to enforce the law to ensure they were not hurt financially by unfair business practices.’
  • 99) ‘‘The reason the magazine failed was not a failure of the message so much as lousy business practices,’ said Grace.’
  • 100) ‘With the help of scanning technology and just-in-time inventory systems, businesses changed their practices.’
  • 101) ‘The Federal Trade Commission handles complaints about deceptive or unfair business practices.’
  • 102) ‘The whiff of fraudulent business practices will linger.’
  • 103) ‘‘By ignoring ethical business practices, small businesses are missing a trick,’ he said.’
  • 104) ‘We have been effective in changing cultural practices in businesses.’
  • 105) ‘The point is to protect the consumer from predatory business practices.’
  • 106) ‘They also dealt with some topics on unethical practices in business.’
  • 107) ‘Every morning the Indian flag is ceremonially hoisted on a central flagpole, an unusual practice for businesses here.’
  • 108) ‘He said admitting more patients for a short time was good medical practice, to allow doctors to make a diagnosis and provide treatment more quickly.’
  • 109) ‘A strict code of practice is followed when carrying these out to protect the interests of the young person.’
  • 110) ‘However, they have continued to carry out this practice and it's a continued difficulty.’
  • 111) ‘The practice was possibly carried over from a similar arrangement in Massachusetts.’
  • 112) ‘This practice would carry on through the Apollo, Mercury, and Gemini space programs.’
  • 113) ‘Lobby your MP, otherwise our silence will allow this barbaric practice to carry on.’
  • 114) ‘This conclusion is completely at odds with established legal practice and principles…’
  • 115) ‘That the appellant notary acted in accordance with the then general notarial practice does not seem to be contested.’
  • 116) ‘It is now established practice for judges to quash a conviction while suggesting that the appellants are not necessarily innocent.’
  • 117) ‘It is the universal practice in conveyancing that enquiries as to licences would have been made.’
  • 118) ‘Conveyancing practice is plainly a matter within the knowledge of the courts.’
  • 119) ‘It should be good practice for a repeat performance in March, when they go in front of the Commons' Culture Committee.’
  • 120) ‘Like other skill development, intercultural skills are acquired through practice.’
  • 121) ‘One of a pair of identical twins was given a lot of early practice at a particular skill, such as crawling.’
  • 122) ‘As with any skill, practice and repetition are the keys to confidence and competent performance.’
  • 123) ‘Specifically military skills were acquired by actual practice and performance under supervision.’
  • 124) ‘The purpose was to demonstrate that knowledge could be acquired easily but skills came with practice.’
  • 125) ‘Responsible believing is a skill that can be maintained only through constant practice.’
  • 126) ‘She worked very very hard on developing her skills at swimming and put in a lot of practice and training before the Olympics.’
  • 127) ‘The major element in such transformation was repeated practice of close order drill.’
  • 128) ‘They are skilled manipulators who lie with the proficiency of long practice.’
  • 129) ‘We have to ride close to the trees and hold our horses there to share the experience, which is good practice for our riding skills.’
  • 130) ‘Thus, additional practice and greater skill mastery is recommended in preparation for night diving activities.’
  • 131) ‘There was a ‘best dressed’ competition and lots of warm-up singing practice to kick the evening off.’
  • 132) ‘It takes much skill and practice to churn out terracotta articles.’
  • 133) ‘In the weeks before a performance, practice can easily consume six hours a day.’
  • 134) ‘Public speaking is a learned skill that requires practice, effort, and confidence building.’
  • 135) ‘Continued practice and performance should easily eliminate these.’
  • 136) ‘This game offers a great opportunity for practice of various motor skills.’
  • 137) ‘Having little practice in the gymnastic skills, which I was forced to learn during my training, I fell flat on my back.’
  • 138) ‘Also, we wanted to determine whether modest practice would modify performance of either group.’
  • 139) ‘Choir practices are held every Wednesday night at 9 p.m. in the church and all new members are welcome.’
  • 140) ‘Swimmers have two practices daily grouped by age and ability.’
  • 141) ‘The sample consisted of consecutive women attending the practices during time periods randomly selected for data collection.’
  • 142) ‘It has been decided to start a children's choir with practices commencing on Monday 10th October at 8pm and finishing at 8.30 pm.’
  • 143) ‘Weekly choir practices take place in the parish church every Wednesday night at 8.00 pm.’
  • 144) ‘They have been rehearsing every weekend for the last three months, stepping up to daily practices for the last couple of weeks.’
  • 145) ‘There will be a choir practice in Ballylinan on Thursday night at 8pm, for both the folk group and the adult choir.’
  • 146) ‘A choir practice will take place in Woodfield church on this evening.’
  • 147) ‘And the past few months your practices have ran late!’
  • 148) ‘Imagine the chagrin of a young team that has spent several practices learning a conventional offensive play only to meet this pattern.’
  • 149) ‘You see, cheerleading here is a year round sport with practices almost every other day, sometimes more.’
  • 150) ‘All three groups are provided the opportunity to do two-a-day practices during the summer months.’
  • 151) ‘Choir practice continues each Tuesday evening at 7.30 pm and new members would be most welcome.’
  • 152) ‘Choir practice for this ceremony will take place on Monday nights.’
  • 153) ‘They must have had some interesting choir practices.’
  • 154) ‘We constantly stress the sense of accomplishment they should carry away from practice.’
  • 155) ‘As expected, band practice takes up a nice, hefty chunk of their time.’
  • 156) ‘He'd had basketball practice after school and had changed clothes before he came over.’
  • 157) ‘She sharpens her skills at practice in preparation for a pair of weekend games.’
  • 158) ‘He stays late at practice refining skills and stays late in the weight room and film room.’

Examples

  • 1) When people practise a task such as mental arithmetic it becomes automatic and unconscious, freeing up space in the working memory for more complex calculations.
  • 2) The pair are good friends and regularly practise together.
  • 3) Young people must practise responsible behaviour on social networking sites.
  • 4) We are able to practise our religion in peace.
  • 5) Ninety per cent of practising lawyers agree.
  • 6) This background enabled him to practise herbal medicine.
  • 7) Find techniques that have worked and practise them regularly.
  • 8) How people practise skill and knowledge acquisition is crucial.
  • 9) The woman is shocked that he is still practising medicine.
  • 10) But only if you use it regularly and practise a variety of the activities on offer.
  • 11) He put a high value on caring for people and practising good manners.
  • 12) The origins of many of the religions practised here remain shrouded in obscurity.
  • 13) His stint as a naval medical officer was the last time he actively practised medicine.
  • 14) People should be free to practise their religion as long as they allow others to do the same.
  • 15) The chance to influence the highest court in the land is the closest a practising lawyer can come to making law.
  • 16) Maybe business people should go into universities and teach business skills just as practising doctors and lawyers teach medical and law students.
  • 17) Your boyfriend is practised in the art of deception and you're best off without him.
  • 18) She can't practise our art as she is now.
  • 19) In Wasps they face a team well practised in the art of winning when it matters.
  • 20) If you practise regularly, the better you will become and the more you will want to play.
  • 21) Did they take much practise?
  • 22) I would practise, take a nap and then go golfing.
  • 23) But they cannot be mastered and applied by thinking or reading about them -- you must practise, _practise_, _practise_.
  • 24) The first efforts may be very lame, but if you want speed on a typewriter, a record for a hundred-yard dash, or facility in speaking, you must practise, _practise_, _practise_.
  • 25) This practise is almost absent now - my father who can be a little hard of hearing, is unable to follow Hindi movies produced today, but can still understand the older movies broadcast on TV.
  • 26) People at the bottom end of the legal job market seem in practise to drop out of lawyering.
  • 27) I believe usual practise is to assume that if you got a nice early slide this time because of BST, you might get a kick in the rear end later in the year from the return to GMT; your twelve hour night shift magically morphing into a 13hr slog.
  • 28) I suspect it is a senior officer having yet another example of ‘diversity in practise’ for the next promotion board! on January 14, 2010 at 2: 30 pm refurbished laptops as a short fella myself, I know this guy is going to face grief over his height, but it seems he has the right attitude.
  • 29) For example sometimes Scott puts his e-mail address like this: ‘myextralife at gmail dot com’, best practise is to put you e-mail in a picture where the bots cant harvest them easily or hide the e-mail behind a CAPTCHA.
  • 30) My example of the "walking" was one such attempt: I didn't say it was likely that such would happen in practise (it is not), but rather that, legally it wouldn't make sense to assume the literal right to assemble without the incorporation of some panoply (or "penumbra") of associated rights that, while not explicit, in their absense would gut or make a mockery of the one right explicitly given.
  • 31) In some instances, they'd marry the local doctor and support him in practise well able to focus her primary attention upon the family - sons and dauhters following in the family tradition, building up the family dynasty as it were. (not the gigantic supermarket medical centres of today).
  • 32) It is remarkable that mankind, and turtles, and pigeons alone practise kissing; hence the Latin word
  • 33) ‘Kelly was keen to improve her breathing and practised her exercises diligently.’
  • 34) ‘Most importantly, learners must have the opportunity to develop and practise skills that directly improve self directed learning.’
  • 35) ‘For many, driving off road will be a new experience and, if it's to be a regular activity, driving courses are available to practise the required skills.’
  • 36) ‘In response, he skipped school for ten straight days so he could practise and improve his skills.’
  • 37) ‘So, we have an author who has been writing (i.e. practising his skills) for well over twenty years, and a writer who is quite smart enough to do his research.’
  • 38) ‘Jack was still practising his speech-writing skills.’
  • 39) ‘Smaller pieces of material will be available for visitors to Barley Hall to have a go at practising their needlework skills while the project is under way.’
  • 40) ‘Racers across Chippenham are busy practising their flipping skills this week in the run up to the town's annual pancake showdown on Tuesday.’
  • 41) ‘The fearless teenager is practising his mountain unicycling skills in preparation for a charity ride.’
  • 42) ‘Gill has worked in the area for the past five years but has been practising her design skills for around 20 years.’
  • 43) ‘Young bikers are dicing with death by practising their skills on a piece of wasteland.’
  • 44) ‘Therefore, while the results of your education should stay with you forever, skills that are not practised are usually soon lost.’
  • 45) ‘Then, in pairs, we practise ball skills, with the emphasis on making your partner stretch and sprint for the ball, placing it at random.’
  • 46) ‘At a recent health check-up, my GP suggested that I would benefit from practising deep-breathing exercises to calm me down and generally improve my health.’
  • 47) ‘I spend a lot of time practising the skills I need to survive under water, and this is important in ensuring that you have the correct mental attitude.’
  • 48) ‘This is an idea spot for practising your skating skills.’
  • 49) ‘Unable to sit still, Olivia rose to her feet and walked the length of the terrace, practising the calming exercises Ben had taught her.’
  • 50) ‘First the Buddha practised an exercise in breath control, which involved retaining the breath for longer and longer periods of time.’
  • 51) ‘When this is the purpose, one practises constantly and vigorously.’
  • 52) ‘I come away after losing and work out exactly what went wrong - I plan and plot and practise and put it right.’
  • 53) ‘The event, and its proceeds, is meant to help farmers who practise traditional farming methods.’
  • 54) ‘The custom was practised locally but not recognised by the company but some of the apprentices said they had been unaware of this.’
  • 55) ‘It is a custom practised by thousands of people from various parts of South Africa and reflects their heritage and their pride in who they are.’
  • 56) ‘This custom was not practised during the lifetime of the Buddha and it is not known when it was introduced in south-east Asia.’
  • 57) ‘Activists stymied the justice system and the business world by practising the politics of ethnic grievance.’
  • 58) ‘Only a society that practised the customs could decide if they needed review.’
  • 59) ‘He has a day job as a human resources manager in York, but by night and weekends he and his business partner practise techniques to train horses with alternative treatments.’
  • 60) ‘The system may be consigned to the past, but there are still people alive who practise discrimination and people who were hurt by it; that is not going to disappear overnight.’
  • 61) ‘The former playgroup leader has been practising the discipline for 13 years and is now a professional Tai Chi teacher.’
  • 62) ‘Behavioural data from the United Kingdom are consistent with this view, although equally many people, especially young people, are practising safe sex.’
  • 63) ‘He accused the Fisheries Department of trying to prevent his people from practising their traditions and culture.’
  • 64) ‘For centuries astrologers have practised a technique of divination which relies on this same moment-by-moment interconnectedness of mind and universe.’
  • 65) ‘Today, according to the Third World Network, conservation agriculture is practised in about 58 million hectares.’
  • 66) ‘But in the modern politics practised by the conservatives, campaign strategy has to be watched more closely.’
  • 67) ‘Sexual partners will be more vulnerable if they practise unsafe sex than if their activities are low risk.’
  • 68) ‘The young woman behind the counter in the office at Telegraph Cove down the coast was practising diplomacy on some disgruntled tourists when I arrived.’
  • 69) ‘Having practised the discipline since the age of 15, Rebecca is used to gruelling training routines.’
  • 70) ‘Do other boroughs practise such discrimination?’
  • 71) ‘In my teenage years I practised certain evil habits, of which I am too ashamed even to make mention.’
  • 72) ‘If the purpose of practising Yoga is physical benefit, that is the level on which effects will be felt.’
  • 73) ‘He was granted a ticket-of-leave soon after he arrived and began practising his former profession.’
  • 74) ‘He saw ‘no reason why his illness should prevent him from practising his profession.’’
  • 75) ‘The centre now has nearly 300 members, all of whom are nurses who are not practising their profession.’
  • 76) ‘Settled in different cities and practising various professions, most of the alumni had little time for art.’
  • 77) ‘He is equipped with a degree in medicine but has never practised the profession.’
  • 78) ‘She claimed that her right to privacy, dignity and to freely practise her occupation had been violated, and asked that the search warrant be set aside and the raid be declared unlawful.’
  • 79) ‘He went on to teach and practise law until appointed assistant US Attorney-General by Eisenhower in 1953.’
  • 80) ‘He may be dragged before the Grievances Committee of the US courts and de-barred from practising law for attempting to sell the evidence.’
  • 81) ‘They both spent time practising law, but they were politically active while doing it.’
  • 82) ‘Yes, it is possible that he could have been alive and practising law somewhere.’
  • 83) ‘He was later forced to surrender his license to practise law.’
  • 84) ‘The facts there were that an American citizen, with his ordinary residence and indeed practising the law in New York, took a three-year lease of a furnished shooting lodge in Scotland.’
  • 85) ‘Perhaps the most important way in which the Revolution affected architecture in France, however, was through the decline in commissions for practising architects.’
  • 86) ‘New laws were passed preventing them from practising law, serving as officers in the Army or Navy, or voting in local or Parliamentary elections.’
  • 87) ‘Her misdeeds eventually led her to be banned from practising law for seven years.’
  • 88) ‘After Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, Pepys practised law and was brought into Parliament in 1831 on the Fitzwilliam interest.’
  • 89) ‘As a young man Montaigne practised law in Bordeaux and also resided frequently at court.’
  • 90) ‘Although the applicants do not practise immigration law, it was clear from the evidence that uncertainties in this field were causing great concern to firms that did.’
  • 91) ‘He completed his law degree in 1906 and in 1909 qualified for the New Zealand bar, but he didn't continue to practise law.’
  • 92) ‘To practise law in a specific state within the United States requires permission of that state.’
  • 93) ‘For about a half century of Sikh rule, the Sikhs practised their religion and looked after their sacred places with devotion and dignity.’
  • 94) ‘Each person and each group is free to practise their religion, their beliefs, and their fundamental driving forces.’
  • 95) ‘The true doctrine of the Quran, the Islamic holy book, says clearly that people are free to practise their religion as they see fit.’
  • 96) ‘Did these soldiers truly believe the things they were saying about us and were they truly threatened by the fact that we practised our religion?’
  • 97) ‘She added: ‘All we ask for is respect for our right to practise our religion.’’
  • 98) ‘Indeed, they're broadly in line with the teachings of Catholicism - a religion practised by millions of people across Europe.’
  • 99) ‘A key point for believers is that they also believe that practising their religion is directly linked with their destiny.’
  • 100) ‘And, finally, they practised the local religions and accepted the local shamanistic beliefs, and did so with their characteristic intensity.’
  • 101) ‘Buddhism, along with Taoism, are among the most widely practised religions in the predominately ethnic Chinese city state.’
  • 102) ‘In these culturally sensitive times, the film is quick to point out that Hoodoo is not Voodoo, a West African religion practised by millions.’
  • 103) ‘This is a rather odd endeavour for someone who neither believes in nor practises the Vedic religion, nor has ever shown any respect for its great ancient or modern teachers, much less sought to be a disciple in any Vedic tradition or lineage.’
  • 104) ‘Religion is practised passionately with many a young boy aspiring to become a Buddhist monk.’
  • 105) ‘The Christian religion is practised alongside cultural religious practices.’
  • 106) ‘However, some of today's most widely practised religions began as stigmatized worship groups.’
  • 107) ‘In Australia, Spiritualism is practised by all kinds of groups, organisations, individuals and churches.’
  • 108) ‘Meditation classes and a week-long retreat for practising Buddhists will begin in January.’
  • 109) ‘As the poet once penned: ‘What a tangled web we weave when at first we practice to deceive.’’
  • 110) ‘Oh what a tangled web we weave, When first we practise to deceive.’
  • 111) ‘‘O what a tangled web we weave, when first we practise to deceive’.’
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