peace vs piece

peace piece

Definitions

  • 1) A state free of oppressive and unpleasant thoughts and emotions.
  • 2) Harmony in personal relations.
  • 3) A state of tranquility, quiet, and harmony. For instance, a state free from civil disturbance.
  • 4) A state free of war, in particular war between different countries.
  • 5) The absence of war or other hostilities.
  • 6) Freedom from quarrels and disagreement; harmonious relations.
  • 7) Inner contentment; serenity.
  • 8) Public security and order.
  • 9) An agreement or a treaty to end hostilities.
  • 10) to be silent; to refrain from speaking.
  • 11) Exemption from, or cessation of, war with public enemies.
  • 12) See under Justice.
  • 13) Exemption from, or subjection of, agitating passions; tranquillity of mind or conscience.
  • 14) (Jewish Antiq.) A gift or service offered as satisfaction to an offended person.
  • 15) to reconcile one with, to plead one's cause with, or to become reconciled with, another.
  • 16) in a state of peace.
  • 17) Reconciliation; agreement after variance; harmony; concord.
  • 18) a civil officer whose duty it is to preserve the public peace, to prevent riots, etc., as a polliceman, sheriff or constable.
  • 19) (Law), (Theol.) The peace of heart which is the gift of God.
  • 20) Public quiet, order, and contentment in obedience to law.
  • 21) See under Breach.
  • 22) harmonious relations; freedom from disputes
  • 23) the general security of public places
  • 24) a treaty to cease hostilities
  • 25) the absence of mental stress or anxiety
  • 26) the state prevailing during the absence of war
  • 27) Amity
  • 28) A state of quiet or tranquillity; freedom from disturbance or agitation; calm; quietness; repose.
  • 29) Public tranquillity; that quiet order and security which are guaranteed by the laws: as, to keep the peace; to break the peace; a justice of the peace.
  • 30) A state of reconciliation between parties at variance; harmony; concord.
  • 31) A compact or agreement made by contending parties to abstain from further hostilities; a treaty of peace: as, the peace of Ryswick.
  • 32) Quiet, Tranquillity, etc. See rest.
  • 33) Freedom from agitation or disturbance by the passions, as from fear, terror, anger, or anxiety; quietness of mind; tranquillity; calmness; quiet of conscience.
  • 34) neologism To make peace; to put at peace; to be at peace.
  • 35) rare To make or become quiet; to be silent; to stop.
  • 36) archaic Shut up!, silence!; be quiet, be silent.
  • 37) slang Shortened form of peace out; goodbye.
  • 38) Used as a greeting, a farewell, or a request for silence.
  • 39) (at peace) In a state of tranquility; serene.
  • 40) (at peace) Free from strife.
  • 41) (keep/hold) To be silent.
  • 42) (peace out) Used to express “goodbye.”
  • 43) (keep the peace) To maintain or observe law and order.

Definitions

  • 1) A coin.
  • 2) Any one of the chess figures other than a pawn.
  • 3) One of the counters or figures used in playing various board games.
  • 4) An artistic, musical, or literary work or composition.
  • 5) An object that is one member of a group or class.
  • 6) Informal A given distance.
  • 7) A portion or part that has been separated from a whole.
  • 8) What one has to say about something; an opinion.
  • 9) An instance; a specimen.
  • 10) A thing considered as a unit or an element of a larger thing, quantity, or class; a portion.
  • 11) Slang A firearm, especially a rifle.
  • 12) In fireworks, a piece, more or less elaborate, which is fastened to a standard, and when it is ignited, shows a design, such as a face, etc.
  • 13) A relatively small portion in bulk or extent forming a part of the whole in which it is or was included; a part; bit; morsel: as, a piece of bread or of chalk; a piece of ground; a piece of history; a piece of one's mind.
  • 14) In bookbinding, a tablet of leather which fills a panel on the back of a book.
  • 15) A separate bit; a fragment: as, to fall to pieces; to break, tear, cut, or dash to pieces.
  • 16) A coin: as, a piece of eight (see phrase below); a fourpenny piece.
  • 17) In chess, checkers, etc., one of the men with which the game is played; specifically, in chess, one of the superior men, as distinguished from a pawn.
  • 18) See the qualifying words.
  • 19) In brewing, a quantity of grain steeped and spread out at one time to make malt. Also called floor.
  • 20) A lunch; a snack.
  • 21) In entomology, any definitely hardened or chitinized part of the integument, especially of the abdomen, thorax, or head: technically called a sclerite.
  • 22) In whaling, specifically, a section or chunk of blubber, more fully called blanket-piece (which see, below).
  • 23) A distinct job or operation taken separately; the amount of work done or to be done at any one time: as, to work by the piece; to do piece-work.
  • 24) A ship; a vessel.
  • 25) A building; a castle.
  • 26) A cup or drinking-vessel: also used indefinitely for a cask or barrel of wine, as the equivalent of the French pièce, which has different values in different parts of France.
  • 27) A distinct artistic or literary production; a separate article, poem, drama, painting, statue, or other artistic or literary work: as, a piece of music; to speak a piece; a finely painted piece.
  • 28) A definite and continuous quantity; a definite length, as of some textile fabric delivered by a manufacturer to the trade; a whole web of cloth or a whole roll of wall-paper: as, goods sold only by the piece; a whole piece of lace.
  • 29) A specimen, instance, example, or sort: as, a piece of impudence; a piece of carelessness.
  • 30) A plot of ground; a lot; a field; a clearing.
  • 31) An individual; a person: now used only contemptuously, and commonly of women: as, she is a bold piece.
  • 32) A small portion of time; a little while.
  • 33) A separate article; a thing: as, a piece of plate.
  • 34) A cannon or gun; a firearm: as, his piece was not loaded; a fowling-piece.
  • 35) To unite by a coalescence of parts; to fit together; to join.
  • 36) To mend by adding pieces or a piece to.
  • 37) To join or unite the pieces of.
  • 38) (of a piece) Belonging to the same class or kind.
  • 39) (piece by piece) In stages.
  • 40) (piece of work) A remarkable person, achievement, or product.
  • 41) (a piece of (one's) mind) Frank and severe criticism; censure.
  • 42) Informal (piece of cake) Something very easy to do.
  • 43) (piece of the action) A share of an activity or of profits.
  • 44) (piece of ass) A person, especially a woman, considered sexually attractive.

Examples

  • 1) This could risk destabilising the peace process.
  • 2) This is a commitment to keep trying to bring peace to my country.
  • 3) This will give you peace of mind if anything goes wrong before your trip.
  • 4) Rest in peace bro and look after my dad up there!
  • 5) Looking for peace and quiet in the bedroom?
  • 6) Previous peace efforts ended in failure.
  • 7) Under the terms of the peace deal, their crimes were forgiven.
  • 8) Using the Nobel prize as an incentive to make peace in the future does not always work.
  • 9) To say peace building and the environment are one, and women empowerment is essential.
  • 10) Ring meets fiery end and peace is restored.
  • 11) The window was open and he looked at peace at last.
  • 12) Why not a series on relationships or finding peace?
  • 13) It gives people certainty and peace of mind going into their marriage.
  • 14) Will the peace process go with it?
  • 15) His purpose was to restore peace and freedom.
  • 16) You will still have the peace of mind of the manufacturer warranty.
  • 17) Unions last night demanded the exec sign off a peace deal before quitting.
  • 18) This will not end with a peace treaty.
  • 19) What my grandfather needed more than anything was peace and quiet.
  • 20) There is an amazing feeling of peace and calm.
  • 21) She was arrested for breaching the peace and taken away in handcuffs.
  • 22) peace processes thus become sacrosanct and must be kept going at all costs.
  • 23) Some people said you have become an international figure of peace.
  • 24) The message of peace and harmony may be easy to preach.
  • 25) He has pledged to bring his country to peace by the end of the year.
  • 26) More than eight months have passed since the last round of peace talks were suspended.
  • 27) This is the place to find real peace and tranquillity.
  • 28) So the door is open to have some of the key commanders come in to a peace agreement.
  • 29) We bring peace to our country.
  • 30) So, is he for war and peace?
  • 31) I'M pleased that peace talks are going to commence in Afghanistan.
  • 32) You'd actually get fed up with people giving you peace signs all day.
  • 33) This is not'the final piece in the jigsaw' of the peace process.
  • 34) Bush tells another bald-faced whopper, claims he has laid the 'foundation of peace'! yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'Bush tells another bald-faced whopper, claims he has laid the \'foundation of peace\'! '
  • 35) Black Elk said these words: "Above all, you should understand that there can never be peace between nations until there is known that true peace… is within the souls of men."
  • 36) The announcement of several Stalin peace prizes was seen as a move in the Soviet “peace offensive, ” which had become the main Communist propaganda weapon in the cold war.
  • 37) In a little town a few miles off, it has been reported that Miss Lydia Prateapace has been obliged to "swear the peace against him," which "swearing the _peace_" is, in most cases,
  • 38) The next thing we observe respecting this divine peace which has come down to man on earth is, that it is a _living peace_.
  • 39) War is generally terminated, and peace secured, by _treaties of peace_.
  • 40) There is going to be peace, but not permanent peace—not a democratic peace….
  • 41) And peace is produced by justice -- the moral virtue which is concerned with our works: _The work of justice shall be peace_ [331] inasmuch, that is, as a man, by refraining from injuring others, removes occasions of strife and disturbance.
  • 42) And it is a maxim not to be despised, “Tho peace be made, yet it is interest that keeps peace”; —and I hope you will not trust such peace except so far as you see interest upon it.
  • 43) Mexico, and he to make peace with us: of course an _agreeable peace_
  • 44) ‘Now my Sundays are for worship, family, friends, reading, rest, and relaxation-such freedom and peace.’
  • 45) ‘He said the number of visitors also had a social impact, both on other visitors who went in search of peace and tranquillity, and on the local population.’
  • 46) ‘There was just something about her that radiated peace, tranquility, and that made her very popular.’
  • 47) ‘Even so I seemed at every point of contact to be surrounded by abrasive people intent on disturbing my peace, my comfort, and my equable nature.’
  • 48) ‘All we can give them is honor for their sacrifice, and freedom and peace for their families.’
  • 49) ‘It was as if it had suddenly tasted peace and freedom after the tumult and congestion of Italy.’
  • 50) ‘Right now, it's telling me that I've enjoyed dropping out of the rat race over the festive period, savouring peace, relaxation and sleep.’
  • 51) ‘But that period of peace from the media will now come to an abrupt end.’
  • 52) ‘This would be followed by a short period of peace with respite from the pressure inside his head.’
  • 53) ‘For three noisy, polluted decades they have campaigned for the bypass which would restore their village's peace and safety.’
  • 54) ‘But you need only step a few streets away from the beach for the cacophony to subside and for peace to be restored.’
  • 55) ‘The right to enter a church, to worship, say a prayer, soak up the atmosphere and to find a few moments' peace should be free to all.’
  • 56) ‘The centre offers a place of peace and hope for those who are on the road to recovery.’
  • 57) ‘A way of life beckons that promises peace in a beautiful place, where the weather is kind, wine plentiful, and food exquisite.’
  • 58) ‘We offer peace and quiet, no resident children, structured control and security.’
  • 59) ‘Incredible calm and peace of mind come from living in a beautifully organized home.’
  • 60) ‘The benefits, they say, include improved health, greater energy, stress relief and peace of mind.’
  • 61) ‘No longer a primary source of food, our gardens may exist simply for pleasure and peace of mind.’
  • 62) ‘Victory over enemies will give you satisfaction and peace of mind, but beware of discord in the family.’
  • 63) ‘Having a forgiving spirit is one formula to peace of mind, happiness and good health.’
  • 64) ‘Would this move bring me the happiness and peace of mind that I feel I have needed recently?’
  • 65) ‘For her the children always came first, well before her own happiness and peace of mind.’
  • 66) ‘We spend our lives in pursuit of happiness and peace of mind.’
  • 67) ‘Mental illness can rob a person of peace of mind, relationships, and sense of purpose in life.’
  • 68) ‘From the layman's point of view, a spiritual life gives you calmness and peace of mind.’
  • 69) ‘If this money won't buy me happiness, at least it can give me some peace of mind.’
  • 70) ‘Perhaps the highest price is the loss of happiness, the inability to achieve peace of mind.’
  • 71) ‘And would he trade his musical style for more peace of mind?’
  • 72) ‘It will definitely help bring some peace of mind to law-abiding citizens who are rightfully concerned about the safety of their children.’
  • 73) ‘This guilt started affecting my work, my peace of mind.’
  • 74) ‘Recognizing your inner beauty is the true key to peace of mind.’
  • 75) ‘It would definitely bring the much needed peace of mind.’
  • 76) ‘We are increasing our budget for next year to prevent crime and to give customers peace of mind.’
  • 77) ‘If only peace of mind were so easily attainable.’
  • 78) ‘It also has everything you need for complete peace of mind.’
  • 79) ‘It had gained respect and authority by ushering in a period of peace and stability in the city.’
  • 80) ‘That's what I think Americans can do with this providential period of prosperity and peace.’
  • 81) ‘The resulting peace agreement included a six-year interim period before a vote on independence.’
  • 82) ‘Great prosperity at home and peace abroad enshrine the current period as a golden age in the nation's history.’
  • 83) ‘For China, reform and development require a long period of peace.’
  • 84) ‘The prolonged period of peace in Europe has created a dangerous temptation to neglect our defences, both physical and psychological.’
  • 85) ‘It also tells us that there was a long period of peace as the men were not needed to fight in any wars.’
  • 86) ‘The island, as a whole, is enjoying a sustained period of peace as we face the new century for the first time in decades.’
  • 87) ‘Private property and relative freedom to trade gave humanity the longest period of peace in history.’
  • 88) ‘Both kenjutsu and jujutsu aimed at being self defence martial arts during the period of peace.’
  • 89) ‘Yes, there were aberrations like the American Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War, but mostly it was a period of peace.’
  • 90) ‘War had resumed on the continent in 1805, though the period of peace with Britain had ended even before the Empire was proclaimed.’
  • 91) ‘It was also realized in both kingdoms that for changes to be implemented, there needed to be a period of peace.’
  • 92) ‘As a consequence Egypt enjoyed long periods of peace when society advanced rapidly.’
  • 93) ‘We were told that the end of the Cold War would bring a new period of peace and reduced military spending.’
  • 94) ‘Other countries, including members of the European Union, may also be welcomed to play a role in monitoring any peace agreement.’
  • 95) ‘The simple thirst for revenge on the part of a few could be enough to derail any peace agreements that might come about in the future.’
  • 96) ‘With the comprehensive peace agreement, the suffering of our people will come to an end.’
  • 97) ‘Neither party will trust the other to implement any peace agreement on its own.’
  • 98) ‘It reopens the prospect of a period when resistance to imperialism is not about peace processes, but about struggle.’
  • 99) ‘Finally, in 1842, the Chinese were forced to agree to an ignomious peace under the Treaty of Nanking.’
  • 100) ‘We must conduct our affairs in such a way that it becomes in the Communists' interest to agree on a genuine peace.’
  • 101) ‘Now they have to prove that they have not only the will but the authority to end the violence and negotiate a compromise peace.’
  • 102) ‘The selection committee nudges warring parties towards a peace that is achievable, but not quite achieved.’
  • 103) ‘They negotiate a peace with the French, who agree in the hope of gaining future advantage.’
  • 104) ‘Hungary, a German satellite in the war, tried, covertly, to negotiate a separate peace.’
  • 105) ‘It also recommends concrete steps that need to be taken as part of the process of negotiating a lasting peace.’
  • 106) ‘An uneasy peace was negotiated during the dying embers of Bonetti's reign.’
  • 107) ‘The peace effectively reinstated the Treaty of Madrid but on more favourable terms for the French.’
  • 108) ‘We know this fight is the way to defend the values that are at the basis of civil life and peace.’
  • 109) ‘Contention leads to war, and war is the antithesis of civil peace.’
  • 110) ‘To recognize the right to free association might have meant to deprive hundreds of millions of the right of civil peace.’
  • 111) ‘Let us confirm our commitment to all civil rights and let us declare peace a civil right in a democracy, a human right in this world.’
  • 112) ‘Meanwhile another, more ominous phantom revolution was threatening civil peace in Germany.’
  • 113) ‘For civil peace - if not justice - to come about, the crimes and violence of the past have to be confronted.’
  • 114) ‘It is the foundation of our priceless civil peace, which is the envy and wonder of the world.’
  • 115) ‘He divided the prize money evenly among five organizations devoted to civil rights and peace.’
  • 116) ‘Good relations with Elizabeth were vital to maintaining the civil peace in France.’
  • 117) ‘The state relied on the clan for the maintenance of a minimum of civil peace, in exchange leaving it a free hand as far as internal politics were concerned.’
  • 118) ‘It acknowledges the de facto separation of peoples in order to try to achieve civil peace.’
  • 119) ‘A Council source revealed the investigation into the assault could take weeks to complete but moves have already been made to restore peace.’
  • 120) ‘If he can do this, peace will be automatically restored!’
  • 121) ‘This was 7.30 on a Saturday morning and we fought for an hour and a half, with the alarm sounding continually, to restore peace to the neighborhood.’
  • 122) ‘Police officers who restored peace to the riot-torn streets of Bradford last year were also due to be honoured for their bravery last night.’
  • 123) ‘The meeting was held to chalk out measures for restoring peace on the campus.’
  • 124) ‘There are signs that peace has been restored and businesses are showing profits once again.’
  • 125) ‘He said he hoped his visit would be a focal point for discussion of what the community could do to restore peace.’
  • 126) ‘There were rumblings and grumblings at special meetings called by the church council in a vain bid to restore peace.’
  • 127) ‘The king insists that he took direct control over the country's affairs to restore peace at a time when violence literally engulfed the kingdom.’
  • 128) ‘They truly were in dire straights, and the offer of peace was very tempting.’
  • 129) ‘The cash call smacks of poor taste, taking advantage of people's fears and anxieties by making promises of peace.’
  • 130) ‘The incomprehensible sermon was long past, and the handshake of peace was next.’
  • 131) ‘Big hugs or strong handshakes while sharing the peace can be painful for people with arthritis or rheumatic conditions.’
  • 132) ‘Seek out those with disabilities when passing the peace and extend Christ's welcome.’

Examples

  • 1) If the piece is being sold by a lot of sellers all claiming the same thing.
  • 2) The alternative is to buy a piece of land to build something.
  • 3) Is the person of the artist always present in a piece of art?
  • 4) Everything rides on this piece of equipment.
  • 5) An early piece of legal work led to an important victory in court.
  • 6) What was the impulse behind putting the two pieces together?
  • 7) The proportion of international workers in a company is one of the pieces of information that companies may be asked to provide.
  • 8) pieces are fitted together, all is not as it seems, danger lurks in unexpected places.
  • 9) What a beautiful and contradictory piece of advice.
  • 10) The battery is the most important and expensive piece of equipment used in the process.
  • 11) So was my brother a piece of art?
  • 12) Then two pieces that fit together on the back and front of your chest.
  • 13) Understanding individual pieces of information does not insure memory of the pieces.
  • 14) On a table beneath the open window was a gramophone playing a piece of music.
  • 15) Tape the two pieces together and leave overnight.
  • 16) Why would the former choose to write his piece mostly in the first person?
  • 17) It is a vital piece of equipment.
  • 18) Tear the soft parts into small pieces and place in a large bowl.
  • 19) We hope historians will go and piece something together.
  • 20) What very small fine pieces it has cooked into!
  • 21) All bits and pieces were kept in place.
  • 22) What was the best piece of advice you received?
  • 23) You have got to know how to move your pieces around the board.
  • 24) We are witness to a beautiful and absorbing piece of theatre.
  • 25) Who would have thought that a piece of land would cause me such a headache?
  • 26) Other mail art pieces are more topical.
  • 27) Picture frames get a new lease of life when fitted with a piece of mirrored glass.
  • 28) Like the first try it was a typical piece of individual brilliance.
  • 29) Listen to a relaxation tape or play a favourite piece of music.
  • 30) Individual pieces could sell for in excess of 125,000.
  • 31) They hear one piece of music - maybe on an advert or the radio - and they go off in another direction.
  • 32) The main piece is a large rectangular cardboard box, which fits nicely between the patio steps and the unused western gate.
  • 33) In the title piece of Steven Millhauser's collection of new and selected stories, "We Others" Knopf, 387 pages, $27.95 , the "we" refers to phantoms who infiltrate picket-fenced suburbia—becoming "the companions of lawn mowers in toolsheds, of gas grills beside tarp-covered woodpiles"—and who try in vain to join the lives of the people who live there.
  • 34) The seven shorts included all have winter and holiday themes, naturally, including the title piece and "Bitzer's New Hat," "Snowed In" and the like.
  • 35) Nora Ephron worries about a failing memory in the title piece of "I Remember Nothing," her inviting new collection of essays.
  • 36) The sumthin 'Nariani worked up for "ILLhaam" was the surprise aerial choreography of the title piece, shown in the video above I shot it from my seat; a professionally-produced video will be available by the holidays on DVD, which brought a Cirque du Soleil-like element of graceful movement to the precision movements of the dancers grounded on the stage.
  • 37) I reminded myself that I had missed my regular writing session yesterday, and then I remembered something Joan Didion wrote in the preface to Slouching Towards Bethlehem about writing the title piece:
  • 38) ‘In a second the whole sword was broken in pieces and Kashiro's attack continued.’
  • 39) ‘Sections of main roads are completely broken to pieces.’
  • 40) ‘Then she took out a lump of sandalwood from the wall cupboard, washed it, broke it in pieces, dissolved it in water and cleaned her face and arms with the paste.’
  • 41) ‘In the busy commercial streets of the city you will find huge pumpkins broken to pieces and scattered on the road.’
  • 42) ‘In the middle of the confusion, the thieves try to get away with the mirror, only to break it to pieces in their fight to have the first glance.’
  • 43) ‘Break the chocolate in pieces and melt with the rum in a bowl over simmering water.’
  • 44) ‘Oh well, at least her mom didn't have to worry about cutting the pizza, it was broken in pieces already.’
  • 45) ‘She picks up a glass vase and flings it on the ground, breaking it to pieces.’
  • 46) ‘Gradually it starts to be crushed in one direction and then stretched in another until it is broken to pieces.’
  • 47) ‘The gold chain was retrieved and returned to the owner, albeit in pieces and with a portion missing following the scuffle.’
  • 48) ‘Her bed with torn to pieces with cloth and portions of her blanket lying all over the floor.’
  • 49) ‘Near the bottom is a chunk that originally was a piece of soundproofing material.’
  • 50) ‘The girls made the discovery after spotting a piece of red material sticking out of the ground in the park's wooded area.’
  • 51) ‘A police spokesman said that the man was scrabbling across the slope when a piece of rock broke away.’
  • 52) ‘Men broke into the mill and smashed them to pieces.’
  • 53) ‘She saw a piece of it break off and a gout of flame shoot into the air.’
  • 54) ‘Avie looked down at her tray and started to break off a piece of her cookie.’
  • 55) ‘I glued all three pieces in place with epoxy.’
  • 56) ‘Scarlet sighed as she put a small piece of pumpkin pie in her mouth.’
  • 57) ‘With that, my mother knife and cut a small piece of the pie.’
  • 58) ‘The scribble is constructed from 229 separate pieces of steel, weighs 25 tonnes and has 72 twists.’
  • 59) ‘All of the pieces are cast or constructed in nonferrous metals, so that they resonate musically.’
  • 60) ‘Sometimes pieces of the construct will be inserted as well as, or instead of, the full construct.’
  • 61) ‘The kit contains hundreds of miniature pieces of the popular construction toy that comprises a building system of rods and connectors.’
  • 62) ‘In my day we only had the simplest of Lego pieces - just square blocks.’
  • 63) ‘Silversmith Biggs was responsible for the basic design and construction of the piece.’
  • 64) ‘The pieces of the iron construction crashed down into the water.’
  • 65) ‘He suggested that the regulations previously construed could be said to apply to particular pieces of machinery of an unduly hazardous nature.’
  • 66) ‘Even so, you could recycle those items into scrap pieces to make parts for another robot.’
  • 67) ‘After that, you start sanding other people's work and start to help put pieces of furniture together.’
  • 68) ‘By combining the good pieces and assembling them into a somewhat complete firearm, it can now be sold as a functioning weapon.’
  • 69) ‘If you wonder if you can replace the clutch yourself, you should first consider how much knowledge you have regarding how to do it and the car pieces involved.’
  • 70) ‘For all customers who want to coat boat pieces and other non-car pieces, or car pieces which don't appear on our price list, we have tried to give you enough information below to estimate what your piece(s) would cost.’
  • 71) ‘Construction pieces from every set can be combined in an infinite number of ways, which contributes to excitement and adventure.’
  • 72) ‘The laser device is used to monitor the correct alignment of mechanical pieces over a distance up to 10 m.’
  • 73) ‘We treat house plants like a piece of the furniture that fills the same space in a room all year round.’
  • 74) ‘The group consists of 32 dancers, eight singers and a 13 - piece band.’
  • 75) ‘Five female vocalists belted out soul classics backed by a 14 - piece band.’
  • 76) ‘A four piece jazz band was assembled in the corner, playing for the customers.’
  • 77) ‘When searching for a suitable piece as an investment, the condition of an antique piece is very important.’
  • 78) ‘While a lot of the most valuable Shaker pieces are now antiques, the newer pieces, which are in the Shaker style, are extremely popular.’
  • 79) ‘I have got some soundtracks that have huge orchestras, 80 - piece orchestras.’
  • 80) ‘She left her job to pursue that dream and had even purchased a small piece of property to start the business in.’
  • 81) ‘I stubbed one of my toes on a piece of furniture last night.’
  • 82) ‘It's believed she was injured by a large blunt object, possibly a piece of furniture.’
  • 83) ‘The £500 prize will be used to buy a piece of reproduction medieval furniture.’
  • 84) ‘In short, there are hundreds of variations you can use when finishing a piece of furniture.’
  • 85) ‘A piece of furniture, probably an old rotted sofa was covered with a white sheet.’
  • 86) ‘He would then get up, grab at a piece of furniture, and throw it about the room.’
  • 87) ‘Plain vinyls and some fabrics can reverse their direction when being put on a piece of furniture.’
  • 88) ‘This observation may be used to help determine whether a piece of furniture has been rebuilt, using new wood.’
  • 89) ‘Among the museum's acquisitions, he discovered a piece of furniture that he had made 40 years before.’
  • 90) ‘Those who are a dab hand with the paintbrush can update a piece of wooden furniture, such as a chair or side table, with jet-black gloss.’
  • 91) ‘Occasionally a client will have a specific project or a piece of furniture that he wants to make.’
  • 92) ‘If you have room, consider adding a piece of outdoor furniture like a wicker chair or table.’
  • 93) ‘When you buy a share of stock, you purchase a piece of the company. You become part owner of the company.’
  • 94) ‘Unlike buying equity, investors do not own a piece of the company or government entity.’
  • 95) ‘You can now give the gift of share ownership to a fan of The Walt Disney Company so they can own a piece of the company.’
  • 96) ‘When you own shares of a company's stock, you own a piece of the company, sharing in its successes or failures along the way.’
  • 97) ‘The idea behind the executive share option is that incentivised executives will work harder if they can see themselves owning a piece of the company they work for.’
  • 98) ‘We're not trying to just write songs, we're trying to write musical pieces.’
  • 99) ‘His close friendships with women produced some of the best-known pieces of music ever written by any composer; but they did not secure him a wife.’
  • 100) ‘A child prodigy, he wrote his first piece of music at the age of five and completed his first symphony at the age of eight.’
  • 101) ‘He wrote and arranged many pieces of liturgical music, and set up several computer programs.’
  • 102) ‘Has anyone ever heard a beautiful piece of music played on a recorder?’
  • 103) ‘The program consisted of a wide range of varying pieces, including songs written by each of the performers.’
  • 104) ‘There is currently an open invitation for composers to write pieces for the bells.’
  • 105) ‘They are both very beautiful pieces, both musically and lyrically, and her voice is just gorgeous.’
  • 106) ‘Students write about narrative pieces and give a title to their artwork.’
  • 107) ‘She composed at least eight pieces, written for a variety of voices, instruments, and genres.’
  • 108) ‘Never has such a beautiful piece of music been played on the electric guitar.’
  • 109) ‘Many of the pieces are beautifully written and personal.’
  • 110) ‘Next, I shared how Beethoven's music was much more emotional and how he often wrote pieces in a minor key.’
  • 111) ‘I might even offer the theory that it is the most perfect piece of music ever written.’
  • 112) ‘As a composer, he wrote several pieces for the oboe family, which I am delighted to publish.’
  • 113) ‘Soon afterwards he was writing his own pieces, and at seven he became only the second child under the age of 10 ever to be accepted by the Vienna Conservatoire.’
  • 114) ‘Ideas and written pieces can be published online and vetted by readers before going to print, blogging helps the journalism process.’
  • 115) ‘Each fellow will write several pieces while in residence, which will each be subjected to detailed criticism.’
  • 116) ‘The piece conveys the sense of an urgent, fully focused formal sensibility at work.’
  • 117) ‘Most, in fact, are relatively early pieces by composers who are now mid-career.’
  • 118) ‘Changing the public mood would require three crucial pieces of evidence.’
  • 119) ‘But the crucial piece of evidence would be a description of a possible attacker.’
  • 120) ‘It also showed that a crucial piece of evidence was a baseball cap dropped by the murderer as he ran from the off licence.’
  • 121) ‘The Government has certainly learnt a lot in the last 3 years, and those pieces of legislation are examples of what it has learnt.’
  • 122) ‘A few examples of specific pieces of advice convey a sense of the value of Machiavelli's memo.’
  • 123) ‘Could this crucial piece of evidence be the cause of this poor girl's suicide?’
  • 124) ‘You make no reference to this event or these pieces of evidence in your second report, do you?’
  • 125) ‘And so, basically that was one of the key pieces of evidence that investigators were trying to get a hold of here.’
  • 126) ‘A number of pieces of evidence have come forward to strengthen that.’
  • 127) ‘But given the circumstances, it is, I think, one of the stronger pieces of evidence.’
  • 128) ‘DNA evidence is included in that, but there were other pieces of physical evidence that were left behind.’
  • 129) ‘But under Scottish criminal law, two separate pieces of corroborating evidence are required to secure a conviction.’
  • 130) ‘They've identified 120 different pieces of evidence that they have concerns with.’
  • 131) ‘Let me briefly mention two other pieces of survey evidence that are difficult to square with the setpoint model.’
  • 132) ‘There are 170 pieces of evidence against him proving he did this, two that they want retested.’
  • 133) ‘It may be one of the few solid pieces of evidence that the prosecution has been able to put up-to-date.’
  • 134) ‘In a post-mortem examination, the smallest pieces of evidence can be the most important in explaining the cause of death.’
  • 135) ‘We question the value of this piece of advice in the otherwise useful protocol.’
  • 136) ‘Is there any risk that the two euro coin will be mistaken for the Thai 10 baht piece, whose face value is eight times less?’
  • 137) ‘They also included a selection of threepenny bits, a 1916 halfpenny and a penny piece from 1921.’
  • 138) ‘Well, you have to admit it's slightly more plausible than upping the value of the penny piece to £1.’
  • 139) ‘This guy thinks we should get rid of the dime and replace it with an 18 cent piece.’
  • 140) ‘He spins on the proverbial sixpence/one euro piece but drags his shot wide.’
  • 141) ‘Flowers range in size from a five cent piece to a compact disc in diameter.’
  • 142) ‘The parsnips are ready to harvest when the crown is the diameter of a 50 cent piece.’
  • 143) ‘Would you shed a tear if the five cent piece suddenly disappeared from circulation?’
  • 144) ‘The boy passed them the letters, and two penny pieces, then thanked them for their kindness before returning the way he had come.’
  • 145) ‘Was it one customer too many with the bags of two cent pieces?’
  • 146) ‘I put $20 in five and ten cent pieces into an old jam jar, then filled it with water and placed it in the freezer.’
  • 147) ‘They were presented with a pouch containing silver one, two, three and four penny pieces from golden trays held by the Yeomen of the Guard.’
  • 148) ‘The penny piece is now worth less in real terms than either the farthing or the decimal halfpenny when they were withdrawn from circulation.’
  • 149) ‘Now, $2 coins seem tiny and a handful of 20 and 50 cent pieces weigh far too much.’
  • 150) ‘Rain is continuing to come down across the region, with reports of hail the size of 20 cent pieces.’
  • 151) ‘They also snatched her purse, and took two old shilling pieces and a ladies watch.’
  • 152) ‘She was sat on her desk, moving some puzzles' pieces, trying to figure out something, maybe an image, or a letter.’
  • 153) ‘Knowing this, you can try and figure out which pieces are which simply by how they're being moved.’
  • 154) ‘It was an abstract race game called Tempo in which pieces were moved not by the roll of the dice, but by the playing of cards.’
  • 155) ‘Adam moved his chess piece and leaned back, satisfied with the way the game was progressing.’
  • 156) ‘Withdrawing from the banquet and watching others move chess pieces was more compatible with his bleak mood.’
  • 157) ‘Then, once many of his pieces cannot move, you add yours and win the game.’
  • 158) ‘The objective is simply to be the first to move all the pieces across the board and into the star point opposite.’
  • 159) ‘We love to roll dice and move pieces around a board, plot battleship strategies, play cribbage, chess, and mancala.’
  • 160) ‘Glass playing pieces for board games have also been found in some numbers.’
  • 161) ‘The buffalo player may only move his pieces one space directly forward as long as that space is unoccupied.’
  • 162) ‘If a piece is in limbo, the player must get it back on the board before moving any other piece.’
  • 163) ‘Game pieces move horizontally and vertically, but not diagonally, making the game more challenging as paths become obstructed.’
  • 164) ‘In the end, he only shuffles around the pieces of a board game of his invention.’
  • 165) ‘Chess pieces and chessboards lend themselves to all sorts of puzzles and mathematical investigations.’
  • 166) ‘She stretched her legs out in front of her in a relaxed position, staring hard at the pieces on the long chess board before her.’
  • 167) ‘Soon, his smile was back and he moved one of his pieces over.’
  • 168) ‘First, I'll show you how each pieces moves, then I'll show some basic opening strategies.’
  • 169) ‘To focus on the moves of the individual pieces without understanding the strategy misses the point.’
  • 170) ‘Charlie moved her pieces with rapid decision, while Adam preferred to take his time.’
  • 171) ‘Hathorne feebly lifted one of the jade pieces and moved it diagonally to the edge of the board.’
  • 172) ‘Here, however, you will find more coverage of endgames with more pieces and pawns.’
  • 173) ‘This can be done by a pawn break or by a sacrifice involving pieces or pawns.’
  • 174) ‘Though the Queen is the strongest piece, it is vulnerable to attack by weaker enemy units.’
  • 175) ‘If the single piece happens to be Queen or Rook, the weaker party becomes all too powerful.’
  • 176) ‘Black gets three pawns for the piece, which leaves him a pawn down on balance - in theory.’
  • 177) ‘Not every man knows his way around a shooting piece, but firearms are a manly art.’
  • 178) ‘It will be surrounded by a two metre-deep trench and have only one entrance, which will be protected by artillery pieces and machine gun posts.’
  • 179) ‘The cavalry turned in its horses for pack mules because mules could carry artillery pieces through rugged terrain.’
  • 180) ‘Artillery pieces did not have sufficient tube elevation or depression angles for direct fire delivery.’
  • 181) ‘He equipped his cavalry with pistols, abandoning the obsolete lance, and began to concentrate standardized artillery pieces in batteries.’
  • 182) ‘Soldiers gather along the length of the trenches, artillery pieces prepare for the opening barrage.’
  • 183) ‘The battle raged for several hours but the Zulus spears were no match for the Boers' rifles and artillery pieces.’
  • 184) ‘Among their weaponry are surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles and artillery pieces.’
  • 185) ‘The gunner's stopped the armoured artillery pieces, ready to fire at a word's notice.’
  • 186) ‘Parrot and Dahlgren developed large, smooth-bore cannon by 1860, not rifled pieces as he implies.’
  • 187) ‘More than half of the aircraft had been damaged beyond use, and most of the larger artillery pieces.’
  • 188) ‘We have the best tanks in the world and the best armored personnel carriers and artillery pieces.’
  • 189) ‘Artillery pieces were faked out of long black logs stuck on old truck wheels.’
  • 190) ‘They had smuggled small artillery pieces and more than 100 small mortars across the US patrolled border.’
  • 191) ‘The wreck has been heavily excavated by archaeologists, but worn iron guns, cannonballs and small pieces are still to be found.’
  • 192) ‘He now was within metres of the artillery piece that shelled him and his late friend.’
  • 193) ‘In order to cover all the sky with a single beam, astronomers must piece it together from millions of separate observations, each of a single point.’
  • 194) ‘Here, two irregular hemispheres were pieced together, as evidenced by a prominent groove that runs around the middle.’
  • 195) ‘She says ‘I took this image of her in four separate images and pieced it together in Photoshop.’’
  • 196) ‘The teacher got her some gluesticks and tape, and Zhoey began piecing her project together slowly.’
  • 197) ‘I pieced the costume together and headed very slowly toward what I hoped was an insane street party.’
  • 198) ‘He began to assemble his guns, slowly piecing them together with metallic clicks and scrapes.’
  • 199) ‘She lifted a puzzle, placed it on a table, and plopped on a chair to piece it together.’
  • 200) ‘Certainly a lot of footage had to be shot for all the possible pathways the story can take, and the footage is pieced together according to your answers.’
  • 201) ‘It was as though major themes of many different movies were pieced together in order to create this story.’
  • 202) ‘Diego must have pieced a lot of missing puzzle pieces together by now.’
  • 203) ‘They are pieced together in the workshop using hundreds of small, cigarette-like incendiaries, called lances.’
  • 204) ‘This image of Titan's landscape was pieced together from several smaller images.’
  • 205) ‘The entire cupola construction was pieced back together over the pool.’
  • 206) ‘Images are pieced together, as if collaged, without regard for perspective.’
  • 207) ‘Hams are pieced together to hide fat and make them look meaty throughout.’
  • 208) ‘The printed panels are then pieced together to make up the mural.’
  • 209) ‘Each work is pieced together from a pair of photographs that don't quite join to form a seamless whole.’
  • 210) ‘Nine different crews then delivered these parts into space where the giant jigsaw puzzle was pieced together.’
  • 211) ‘And eventually a new map of Mediterranean and Eastern European politics was pieced together.’
  • 212) ‘Anyone who has been awake and alert should have pieced the evidence together sufficiently to arrive at an understanding consistent with the one summarized in the Post story.’
  • 213) ‘When the evidence is pieced together, it seems that evolution prepared what society later moulded: a brain to believe.’
  • 214) ‘He's just got to judge the evidence as he pieces it together.’
  • 215) ‘Both sides are equipped for this war, and the jury will have to piece this evidence together to see whether or not this case, they can prove it beyond a reasonable doubt.’
  • 216) ‘Now, usually when someone tells you something important, you have to piece the words together slowly, and really understand them to decipher the meaning.’
  • 217) ‘Simply the fact that it took three editions before it was exposed indicates that few readers cared enough about the evidence to piece it together.’
  • 218) ‘Remembering the heart attack I pieced the evidence together.’
  • 219) ‘Often he just says a string of single words, hoping the listener can piece them together to make sense of what he is trying to say.’
  • 220) ‘Small snippets of that day at the stables returned to her in her dreams, and she was slowly piecing it together.’
  • 221) ‘Somehow I am able to extract enough sense from our dialogue to piece the story together.’
  • 222) ‘Unfortunately, the driver was a plain clothes police officer, who quickly pieced the whole story together.’
  • 223) ‘Later that day, Margaret finally pieced the whole story together.’
  • 224) ‘To tell the story correctly, a person would need to sift through thousands and thousands of pages of archival material from all over the country and then piece bits together into a coherent story.’
  • 225) ‘Later, when she was old enough to understand Katherine's disease, she was able to piece the puzzle together, and it only made her more furious at her father.’
  • 226) ‘Scotland Yard is still trying to piece the story together.’
  • 227) ‘Who I am or why I'm piecing this story together doesn't matter.’
  • 228) ‘We are intrigued by narrative clues, and must piece them together to see the whole picture. The revelations are desolate.’
  • 229) ‘Although most of the early settlers left few if any records, it is still possible to piece their story together.’
  • 230) ‘With the help of this person and others, you can piece the entire story together.’
  • 231) ‘‘Okay,’ David said slowly, as if trying to piece things together.’
  • 232) ‘The Bishop simply "takes notice that the creed was pieced out."’
  • 233) ‘Many of the designs feature piecing fabric, colour blocking, quilting, and many are reversible as well.’
  • 234) ‘Occasionally, a stenciled bedcover was pieced with traditional quilt blocks but was not quilted.’
  • 235) ‘No matter how she pieced them, they contorted into something unacceptable.’
  • 236) he needed a piece of granite
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