know vs no

know no

Definitions

  • 1) obsolete Knee.
  • 2) Middle English forms of knee.
  • 3) A dialectal (Scotch) form of knoll
  • 4) transitive To be acquainted or familiar with; to have encountered.
  • 5) transitive To experience.
  • 6) transitive, archaic, biblical To have sexual relations with.
  • 7) transitive To be certain or sure about.
  • 8) transitive To be informed about.
  • 9) transitive, from To have knowledge of; to have memorised information, data, or facts about.
  • 10) transitive To understand (a subject).
  • 11) have firsthand knowledge of states, situations, emotions, or sensations
  • 12) be aware of the truth of something; have a belief or faith in something; regard as true beyond any doubt
  • 13) be cognizant or aware of a fact or a specific piece of information; possess knowledge or information about
  • 14) To take cognizance; acquire knowledge; get intelligence.
  • 15) To possess knowledge; be informed; have intelligence.
  • 16) To recognize in contrast or comparison; distinguish by means of previous acquaintance or information: as, to know one man from another; we know a fixed star from a planet by its twinkling; to know the right way.
  • 17) To understand from experience or attainment; comprehend as to manner or method: with how before an infinitive: as, to know how to make something.
  • 18) To have sexual commerce with. Gen. iv. 1. [A euphemism.]
  • 19) To recognize after some absence or change; recall to the mind or perception; revive prior knowledge of: as, he was so changed that you would hardly know him.
  • 20) To be acquainted with each other. You and I have known, sir.
  • 21) In a general sense, to have definite information or intelligence about; be acquainted with, either through the report of others or through personal ascertainment, observation, experience, or intercourse: as, to know American history; he knows the city thoroughly.
  • 22) To Perceive or understand as being fact or truth; have a clear or distinct perception or apprehension of; understand or comprehend clearly and fully; be conscious of perceiving truly.
  • 23) To be acquainted with.
  • 24) To regard as true beyond doubt.
  • 25) Archaic To have sexual intercourse with.
  • 26) To perceive directly; grasp in the mind with clarity or certainty.
  • 27) To possess knowledge, understanding, or information.
  • 28) To have fixed in the mind.
  • 29) To perceive as familiar; recognize.
  • 30) To be cognizant or aware.
  • 31) To have experience of.
  • 32) To have a practical understanding of, as through experience; be skilled in.
  • 33) To be able to distinguish; recognize as distinct.
  • 34) To discern the character or nature of.
  • 35) To be assured; to feel confident.
  • 36) [Obs.] to ask, to inquire.
  • 37) To have knowledge; to have a clear and certain perception; to possess wisdom, instruction, or information; -- often with of.
  • 38) To recognize; to distinguish; to discern the character of.
  • 39) To be convinced of the truth of; to be fully assured of.
  • 40) To be acquainted with; to be no stranger to; to be more or less familiar with the person, character, etc., of; to possess experience of
  • 41) To perceive or apprehend clearly and certainly; to understand; to have full information of.
  • 42) to understand the manner, way, or means; to have requisite information, intelligence, or sagacity. How is sometimes omitted.
  • 43) (you know) Used parenthetically in conversation, as to fill pauses or educe the listener's agreement or sympathy.
  • 44) (in the know) Possessing special or secret information.
  • 45) (know (someone) in the biblical sense) To have sexual relations with (someone).

Definitions

  • 1) A negating expression; an answer that shows disagreement or disapproval.
  • 2) A vote not in favor, or opposing a proposition.
  • 3) A negative vote or voter.
  • 4) A negative response; a denial or refusal.
  • 5) abbreviated Number; -- the number designating place in an ordered sequence.
  • 6) A negative vote; one who votes in the negative
  • 7) A refusal by use of the word no; a denial.
  • 8) a negative
  • 9) In Japan, a sort of dignified operatic performance consisting of music and dancing, with recitation. The carved masks worn by the performers indicate the characters portrayed.
  • 10) A negative vote, or a person who votes in the negative: as, the noes have it.
  • 11) of northern
  • 12) In chem., the symbol for noriurn.
  • 13) A denial; the word of denial.
  • 14) Not any; not one; not a.
  • 15) Hardly any.
  • 16) Not at all; not close to being.
  • 17) Not any; not one; none; ; -- often used as a quantifier.
  • 18) quantifier; used with either mass nouns or plural count nouns for indicating a complete or almost complete lack or zero quantity of
  • 19) Not any, not at all.
  • 20) Not at all; not by any degree. Often used with the comparative.
  • 21) Used to express refusal, denial, disbelief, emphasis, or disagreement.
  • 22) Informal Used to indicate agreement with a preceding statement, especially when followed by a stronger judgment supporting that statement.
  • 23) Nay; not; not at all; not in any respect or degree; -- a word expressing negation, denial, or refusal. Before or after another negative, no is emphatic.
  • 24) referring to the degree to which a certain quality is present
  • 25) used to express refusal or denial or disagreement etc or especially to emphasize a negative statement
  • 26) not in any degree or manner; not at all
  • 27) Notany;notone;none.
  • 28) Nor.
  • 29) Seeno.adverb
  • 30) Used to show agreement with a negative question.
  • 31) Used to show disagreement or negation.
  • 32) Used to express strong refusal, doubt, or disbelief.
  • 33) Not (a); not properly, not really; not fully.
  • 34) Not any possibility or allowance of (doing something).
  • 35) Not any.

Examples

  • 1) Perhaps his wife did know about this but chose not to share all the details at work.
  • 2) From past experience we know staff terms and conditions can be targeted for savings.
  • 3) We look each other in the eye and we know if something is right.
  • 4) There was no one who went before you and knew all the answers.
  • 5) No one wants to know about that.
  • 6) But he will know from experience it could be a lot worse.
  • 7) People in the know think something else might be up.
  • 8) I knew all their names and used to pop in at least three times a week.
  • 9) I have struck up conversations with numerous people who know the name of my dog but not mine.
  • 10) As a father I know you will understand how we feel as a family.
  • 11) What do they know about the arts?
  • 12) He will know all the names referenced above.
  • 13) They know experience is a much more powerful teacher than just presentation.
  • 14) Well we all know the answer to that one.
  • 15) Because the rest of the world already knows the names of those involved.
  • 16) This is about understanding yourself and knowing your emotional limits.
  • 17) The answer should be known by the summer.
  • 18) Contact us to let us know your experiences.
  • 19) They know and understand the hand signals.
  • 20) Others are always asking you for advice whether you know the answer or not.
  • 21) The only negative is a family member making their opinions known about how unfair their lot is compared to yours.
  • 22) Most of what we know about his character comes from what other people say about him in helpful expository exchanges.
  • 23) She knew instantly something was wrong.
  • 24) But do you know something strange.
  • 25) It would be interesting to know the name of the justice who freed Malory.
  • 26) It is packed with names you know, or think you know.
  • 27) We don\'t know because we don\'t want to know\ 'which passes for visionary in America circa 2009.
  • 28) For the person offering the service though, I think it is key to know in your mind – to * know* – that you are the best at what you do.
  • 29) “So… you know that I know what you know… what is it you want?”
  • 30) With most endeavors which require knowledge and experience, a group will always “know” more than any one single individual, and many groups together will always know more than any one single Team.
  • 31) It is explained by reason of the fact that the predicate appellates its form (for ˜You know Socrates approaching™ requires that the predicate ˜know Socrates approaching™ be true of you and so is false), whereas ˜Socrates approaching you know™ requires only that ˜Him you know™ be true, referring to Socrates, and it is true.
  • 32) Before I go I'd like to wish anyone reading this a great holiday season, and let you know how much I've enjoyed getting to *know* so many of you this year.
  • 33) Thus in ˜You know Socrates approaching™, the predicate ˜know Socrates approaching™ appellates its concept, the ratio ˜Socrates approaching™, so the proposition is false unless you are aware who it is; whereas in
  • 34) I do know that those who say there will be no more warming are flying in the face of what we *know*.
  • 35) ‘It's good to know that the authorities are aware of the need to protect our environment.’
  • 36) ‘She said the bus companies knew that customers were very aware of green issues and clean fuel.’
  • 37) ‘Anyone who has travelled to Holland knows that they are more aware of human rights.’
  • 38) ‘Kildare went in at half time knowing that they had to retain possession for longer in order to create more meaningful chances in front of goal.’
  • 39) ‘I knew there was a Republican Presidential debate in Iowa today, and I'd intended to watch it.’
  • 40) ‘He was an astute politician, instinctively knowing how to exploit popular feelings for his own advantage.’
  • 41) ‘However, it is worth knowing what symptoms to look for.’
  • 42) ‘We bought our house knowing that it would be tight for the first four or five years.’
  • 43) ‘I had no means of knowing whether he told the truth.’
  • 44) ‘It's strange but just knowing that ‘someone’ out there cares helps, even if it's someone I've never met.’
  • 45) ‘For youngsters struggling with issues like bullying, bereavement and family breakdown, knowing who to turn to once they get to school can be a problem.’
  • 46) ‘I have trained hard in the past and I know what it takes in terms of time and energy.’
  • 47) ‘Before my current job I was in the pub industry for 15 years, so I know what I am talking about.’
  • 48) ‘Her relationship with her own parents is so close that she feels saddened when she hears other parents saying they don't want to know what their children are up to.’
  • 49) ‘Once you know how much money you will have every week you should be able to budget accordingly.’
  • 50) ‘My advice is never download any program from the internet unless you know exactly what it is.’
  • 51) ‘Governments know from experience that struggling companies typically can't be rescued with taxpayer money.’
  • 52) ‘Without that sort of information, firefighters have no way of knowing what is happening inside a building.’
  • 53) ‘Plan your night out, including your journey home, and make sure someone knows where you are and when you will be back’
  • 54) ‘I decided to go down to the company and found other people in the same situation demanding to know what was going on.’
  • 55) ‘She is now growing increasingly concerned and wants anyone who may know of his whereabouts to get in contact.’
  • 56) ‘Remember to let the kennels or cattery know of any particular feeding or other requirements for your pet.’
  • 57) ‘Let it be clear from here on in that I know absolutely nothing about how cars work.’
  • 58) ‘There are additional plot twists that you probably don't want to know about if you plan to see this movie.’
  • 59) ‘If you know of a group which deserves this recognition, make sure you nominate them.’
  • 60) ‘The troops know the truth better than anyone.’
  • 61) ‘Electronic tagging would be a method of ensuring their whereabouts is known at all times.’
  • 62) ‘They should map out a route first and stick to it so their parents know their whereabouts.’
  • 63) ‘He feels lucky his own family knows of his sexual orientation and has accepted him and his partner.’
  • 64) ‘She knew little about her siblings, as it had been years since she had seen or spoken to any of them.’
  • 65) ‘Enlargement of the thyroid gland is known to be associated with hormonal changes in women.’
  • 66) ‘Depression is known to be a major risk factor for heart disease.’
  • 67) ‘My brothers and I used to get letters and I probably still would if she knew my address here.’
  • 68) ‘The first step you should take is to simply limit the number of people who know your personal email address.’
  • 69) ‘Only one person knew my phone number and that was Alli.’
  • 70) ‘A spokesperson for the fire brigade said the cause of the fire was not yet known.’
  • 71) ‘It is believed she may still be in the Nottingham area although she is known to have friends in Cheshire and Bedfordshire.’
  • 72) ‘She is known to have had a relationship with a homeless man who was wanted by police in connection with a stolen credit card.’
  • 73) ‘Perhaps some of the faces will be familiar to our readers or maybe someone even knows the date or the year when the picture was taken.’
  • 74) ‘Chemical fertilizers were unavailable, for eighteenth-century scientists knew too little about plant physiology to devise the right chemical composition.’
  • 75) ‘It hurt thinking about it, knowing that there was absolutely nothing she could do.’
  • 76) ‘We don't know that for sure till we do this clinical trial, but it is a possibility.’
  • 77) ‘He would never let her go - no way; she knew that for sure - it was the only thing she was certain of.’
  • 78) ‘It is important to make sure that your child knows that you love them for who they are and what they do, not how they look.’
  • 79) ‘You might die next week and you might last another 50 years, nobody knows for sure.’
  • 80) ‘Is it just his feeble attempt to ensure that I know he is the boss and the one who wears the trousers?’
  • 81) ‘We may never know with absolute certainty whether he is alive or dead.’
  • 82) ‘I knew with certainty that this time, he was definitely not coming back.’
  • 83) ‘When I met Daniel, I just knew he would be perfect for the role.’
  • 84) ‘It was too late and I knew it.’
  • 85) ‘Where's the basket? I know I left it right here.’
  • 86) ‘We've been friends for a long time so you know you can trust me.’
  • 87) ‘And remember, he knows you're great or he wouldn't be spending his precious time with you!’
  • 88) ‘She cannot identify the voice but knows it does not belong to her parents.’
  • 89) ‘She was getting quite frail near to the end of her life and she knew it.’
  • 90) ‘A child has no fear, has no worry, no anxiety because he knows his mother is near to take care of him.’
  • 91) ‘Fred smiled, knowing that he could trust Will not to leak the information for any reason.’
  • 92) ‘I knew something was wrong when we got off the plane and they were there waiting for us.’
  • 93) ‘Holly smirked, knowing full well that I couldn't win this particular argument.’
  • 94) ‘Dave was well liked and respected by all who knew him.’
  • 95) ‘He's quite shy but once you get to know him he's quite friendly.’
  • 96) ‘She had only known him a few weeks, and she was already spending all of her time with him.’
  • 97) ‘But in the parade most of the shop keepers knew her and some of them would even spend time chatting to her.’
  • 98) ‘Those of you who know me realise that I have a great respect for our nurses who do a hell of a lot for very little.’
  • 99) ‘My first big break was at Traffic - my friend Peter knew someone working there, and I got an interview.’
  • 100) ‘I was not a close friend of Mo and knew her for only a brief period.’
  • 101) ‘I am planning to install a new kitchen and have enlisted the help of an architect I know.’
  • 102) ‘If possible, share a cab with someone else that you know, especially if you are a lone woman.’
  • 103) ‘Appealing for the offenders to come forward, the chief superintendent said: ‘It appears Mr Greenidge was attacked by people who knew him’.’
  • 104) ‘The two of you make a lovely couple; the happiness you radiate enriches everyone who knows you.’
  • 105) ‘He knows me better than anyone else and accepts me.’
  • 106) ‘She also told me after knowing me two weeks that she was NOT EVER going to sleep with me.’
  • 107) ‘It's easier when there's nobody there who knows you or expects anything of you.’
  • 108) ‘My wife is also my best friend, and the person in this world who knows me better than any other.’
  • 109) ‘She helped me realize my true self worth and I've become a better artist and a better person just from knowing her.’
  • 110) ‘I'd only known him a couple of months, but it seemed like he'd been in my life forever.’
  • 111) ‘A single guy coming into a group of guys who already know each other is always going to be awkward.’
  • 112) ‘We have known each other for a number of years and have been married for about two.’
  • 113) ‘We decided to get married last November having known each other for about 6 months.’
  • 114) ‘One can listen to an aria in Italian or German without knowing the language and still get the message.’
  • 115) ‘English children living in France would have to know the language - spoken and written.’
  • 116) ‘This good news comes from someone who knows her subject.’
  • 117) ‘However, there's no disputing the fact that the guy knows his subject.’
  • 118) ‘The gorilla is famous for knowing sign language, and she was able to sign to her handlers in California that she had a toothache.’
  • 119) ‘It is not possible to know a country well without knowing its language.’
  • 120) ‘If you don't know the language of the country you live in, you can't ask for what you need.’
  • 121) ‘Wentworth-Day was an eccentric character, but he certainly knew his subject.’
  • 122) ‘In addition, nearly every citizen of Greenland knows the Danish language.’
  • 123) ‘He knows the language much better than he lets on, but he is far from fluent.’
  • 124) ‘Arabic is the official language of the country and English is widely known throughout Sudan.’
  • 125) ‘Even knowing one language other than your own says so much about your attitude towards the world outside your own country.’
  • 126) ‘He knows the subject and does a very good job of communicating this knowledge.’
  • 127) ‘The author knows his subject and provides much information and analysis not easily available elsewhere.’
  • 128) ‘Neither of them knew any English although both had learned several other languages.’
  • 129) ‘There is no doubt that Hoeckner has something to say, nor is there any doubt that he knows his subject.’
  • 130) ‘This is all very interesting, but can knowing French really help me land a job?’
  • 131) ‘He's been a top club manager, he's got his coaching badges, he knows the game from top to bottom.’
  • 132) ‘Paulo's the Italian, so I let him pick because obviously he knows his wine better than I do.’
  • 133) ‘This was no ordinary place; it was an upmarket historic inn and its chef clearly knew his stuff.’
  • 134) ‘Everyone knows the name and recognises the face but not many of us have actually gone to see him.’
  • 135) ‘Yet Sven Goran Eriksson and his assistant clearly know a player when they see one.’
  • 136) ‘One man recognises a room by a small sign, another knows a street by the tram car numbers.’
  • 137) ‘You might not immediately recognise him but you definitely know the name.’
  • 138) ‘‘I really know your face from somewhere,’ she explains.’
  • 139) ‘It was Patricia talking - I'd know her voice anywhere.’
  • 140) ‘I know that face, where have I seen her before?’
  • 141) ‘Given that many voters wouldn't have known his face until last week, he may have a tough time selling himself as Premier in time for the state election next year.’
  • 142) ‘I have travelled extensively for the past 25 years and I know a good bar when I see one. This is not a good bar!’
  • 143) ‘Anybody familiar with Citroen's larger cars knows the comfort of its hydraulic suspension system.’
  • 144) ‘The castles and heritage trails are known and savoured by visitors from near and far.’
  • 145) ‘Andrea told me that all her girl friends know the site, which really flattered me.’
  • 146) ‘The thing is, I don't like to go to a concert and not be able to sing along to the songs I know.’
  • 147) ‘St. Louisans are partial to certain types of food known nowhere else on the planet.’
  • 148) ‘The former All Black captain knows British conditions from his time at Northampton, where he was an inspirational force.’
  • 149) ‘Chris had decided she should drive, because I didn't know the city.’
  • 150) ‘I know this great little restaurant down the road, we can walk there.’
  • 151) ‘If any of you know any good articles or books that address this problem please let me know.’
  • 152) ‘Do you know any good bars around here?’
  • 153) ‘But Mark Waites knows the New York ad scene from personal experience.’
  • 154) ‘Oliver was in a position to know the personal preferences of generations of British royals.’
  • 155) ‘As a regular cyclist I know only too well the risks I have to face each day on my way to work.’
  • 156) ‘Today, he takes comfort in the fact that his eldest son knew personal happiness and fulfilment in the last few years of his life.’
  • 157) ‘They knew plenty of personal pain and grief, but their country was inviolable and it prospered.’
  • 158) ‘He is a man who has known much personal sorrow in his life, and yet that has not stopped him doing what he can for others.’
  • 159) ‘Melinda, a mother-of-three, knows first-hand how emotions can spiral out of control after giving birth.’
  • 160) ‘John himself was diagnosed with cancer some years ago and knows what a dreadful experience it can be.’
  • 161) ‘She knew poverty, but not the type of poverty that is experienced by some families today.’
  • 162) ‘I've known hard times and good times, but writing has always been my personal salvation and I don't think I could live without it.’
  • 163) ‘I know what it's like to be out of work; I'm grateful for having lots of work because it doesn't always happen.’
  • 164) ‘She kept those feelings locked away though; he was known as a lady-killer for a reason.’
  • 165) ‘I hope as I go on in my career I will be known as a director who can tackle anything.’
  • 166) ‘Do you want to be known as the girl that goes psycho if someone breaks up with her?’
  • 167) ‘That was all before the area, rightly or wrongly, came to be known as a hard and dangerous place.’
  • 168) ‘Scilly is known for its flowers and each year thousands of people flock to the famous gardens on Tresco.’
  • 169) ‘He was involved in numerous projects, was an excellent teacher, and was known for his encyclopaedic knowledge.’
  • 170) ‘His friends know him as a workaholic with an impeccable sense of fairness and attention to detail.’
  • 171) ‘Her friends have always known her as a madcap but her latest fund raising exploits have left them astounded.’
  • 172) ‘Most said they knew him as a harmless, polite and friendly man who had become a familiar figure in the area.’
  • 173) ‘He is known for keeping a low profile and spends a lot of time in the United States.’
  • 174) ‘Emily is known for painting her subjects in their environment.’
  • 175) ‘Lane is internationally known for his groundbreaking work in the fields of biochemistry and nutrition.’
  • 176) ‘The quarter is known for its distinctive architecture and its rich history.’
  • 177) ‘Thai cuisine is known for its distinctive mix of sweet, sour, spicy hot, and savoury flavours.’
  • 178) ‘The area is known as a place to buy marijuana at all hours near a subway station.’
  • 179) ‘The area of Govan, in which the building is situated, is known for its social and spiritual deprivation.’
  • 180) ‘He does not use his title and is known by his first name at the university.’
  • 181) ‘She was born in New York to Greek parents and, before she got her stage name, was known as Aikaterini Hadjipateras.’
  • 182) ‘We certainly know that he did not use his first name Benjamin and was known as Olinde Rodrigues.’
  • 183) ‘Sir Norman Foster's design for the Clyde Auditorium is universally known as the Armadillo.’
  • 184) ‘Takeshima is the Japanese name for the islands known as Dokdo by South Koreans.’
  • 185) ‘I went to a very posh graduate school, affectionately known in some circles as Cambridge Community College.’
  • 186) ‘The police inquiry, known as Operation Declare, should be largely complete by the late summer.’
  • 187) ‘The Lighthouse Inn reactivated its working lens in 1989, and is now known as the West Dennis Light.’
  • 188) ‘In America, he became known by the English name given him by a teacher in grade school.’
  • 189) ‘The scheme, in which new money is used to repay older investors, is known as a Ponzi scheme.’
  • 190) ‘The disease, which does not affect humans and is not a food safety concern, is also known as sudden oak death.’
  • 191) ‘Maggie, as she was known to family and friends, was predeceased by her husband Jimmy.’
  • 192) ‘Jim, as he was popularly known, belonged to an old and highly respected family in the district.’
  • 193) ‘Jimmy, as he was known locally, was a very highly respected member of the farming community.’
  • 194) ‘Jerry, as he was popularly known, was a native of Cork City and had spent much of his early years in England.’
  • 195) ‘In their early stages of stabilization and growth, such languages are known technically as Creoles.’
  • 196) ‘This picture is known as the wheel of life and is familiar throughout the Buddhist world.’
  • 197) ‘Certainly, he is a man who knows his arias from his oboes.’
  • 198) ‘Anyway, we shall all know the answer in three weeks time but my vain hope would be that someone is put in charge of the agricultural portfolio who at least knows his sheep from his goats.’
  • 199) ‘I solicited advice from a doctor friend who knows his asthma from his tennis elbow, and who has studied many branches of medicine.’
  • 200) ‘John used to spend lengthy periods in India as a tour guide and knows his bhuna from his balti.’
  • 201) ‘Not knowing a pesade from a pirouette or a courbette from a capriole, I was seduced by the riders’ dashing livery of black boots, white tights, brown dress coat and gilded bicorn hat, and the ambiance of aristocratic Vienna.’
  • 202) ‘On the weight issue, and for the benefit of those that don't know their kilos from their pounds… there are 2.25 pounds to each kilo.’
  • 203) ‘With all the church news in the media these days, it's important to know your prelates from your pontiffs.’
  • 204) ‘I studied Maths for a long time. I know my rotations from my reflections.’
  • 205) ‘The online survey is quick and easy to fill out, and if you don't know your wallabies from your wombats there's a picture gallery to help you.’
  • 206) ‘But don't worry if this is your first foray into Greek cooking and you don't know your mezedes from your mezedakia.’
  • 207) ‘Whether you've read the script a thousand times, or don't know your Capulets from your Montagues this show is delightful.’
  • 208) ‘If you don't know your weeds from your plants, why not take some samples into your local garden centre for identification?’
  • 209) ‘Even if you don't know your aft from a rudder, you and your kids can learn to sail at Colonna.’
  • 210) ‘Every child should be brought up to know right from wrong and to respect their peers and elders.’

Examples

  • 1) I've no idea of whether it's going to last a minute or half an hour.
  • 2) In the words of LaBeouf, he should have just said…..no no no no no no no no no no no no.
  • 3) I had a man rear end my car..no insurance, no driver's license and no green card!
  • 4) I always found the Japanese oriented no offensive pun intended..no seriously Wolverine stories to be some of the best.
  • 5) I'm no fan of public education as it's currently implemented-off the top of my head, Milton Friedman's voucher proposal in Capitalism and Freedom seems infinitely preferrable to how we do things now-but if the choice is what we have now or *no* public education system then I favor what we have now.
  • 6) no brakes, no hands,..no bars and no fork would be even more tuff. a lot of them look like hairy colourful clowns as is, with their Howard the Duck eyeglasses and oversized flat brimmed hats and all.
  • 7) Promoted to Headline (H2) on 3/30/09: The U.S. has 'no moral standing' to criticize Iran: Zunes yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'The U.S. has \'no moral standing\' to criticize Iran: Zunes '; yahooBuzzArticleSummary =' Article: An interview with the Middle East analyst and expert, Prof. Stephen Zunes, on the U.S. double standards against Iran\'s nuclear dossier, Palestinians\ 'plight and regional conflicts.'
  • 8) May 18, 2009 at 7:07 am no no……..no water boarding.
  • 9) DrDon, as you no doubt know, the time it takes current immigrants to learn english is no different than it was at the beginning of the 20th century. and we got all kinds of funny signs in NYC -- ¡no hay problema, chico!
  • 10) There would be no profanity..no insults...and no interesting reading here.
  • 11) So not only is there _no_ evidence to support the Republicans 'position, there's no real upside to it, unless you're in the oil business or oil services business.
  • 12) ‘For, among many other things, the French and Dutch votes were also noes to the consequences of enlargement and to the prospect of further enlargements.’
  • 13) ‘If one goes to the application book, volume 1, page 23, line 30, it can be seen that it is recorded that the result of the division, this is on the second reading: ayes 14 and noes 13.’
  • 14) ‘Super-optimists suggest that, perhaps with some changes and reassurance from European leaders, the noes might be turned into yeses, like water into wine.’
  • 15) ‘Since then, we've been arguing - sometimes bitterly - about the church's yeses and the noes to modernity and the liberal heritage.’
  • 16) ‘At the time of writing the score was four yeses (US, UK, Spain and Bulgaria) to five noes (France, Russia, China, Germany and Syria) with six doubtful.’
  • 17) ‘Perhaps the editor feels that as a leading member of the ‘traditional left’ on Labour's national Executive, the critique of his string of noes runs a little close to home?’
  • 18) ‘The French noes and the British noes are the most incompatible of all.’
  • 19) ‘‘Yes’ may be easier on them in the short term, but a few more noes are far more effective in the long term.’
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Get audience-specific corrections, access statistics, and view readability scores.

Browser Extensions

Get your writing checked on millions of websites, including Gmail, Facebook, and Google Docs.

Linguix Keyboard

Make your content read and look better on mobile.

MS Office add-ins

Download Linguix for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook to check grammar, punctuation, and style instantly right in your documents.

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