wood anemone

NOUN
  1. common anemone of eastern North America with solitary pink-tinged white flowers
  2. European anemone with solitary white flowers common in deciduous woodlands
Linguix Browser extension
Fix your writing
on millions of websites
Start Error-Free Writing Linguix pencil

How To Use wood anemone In A Sentence

  • Old Park Wood is the most varied piece of woodland in Middlesex with an abundance of flowers in spring including yellow archangel, lesser celandine, wood anemone, coralroot bittercress and bluebells.
  • The forest has not been cut for 300 years, and I found myself surrounded by ground flora such as Solomon's seal, lily of the valley, yellow wood anemone, toothwort, asarabacca, herb paris and hepatica.
  • Snowdrops, wood anemones, primroses, foxgloves and ramsons can all infuse woods with colour through sheer force of numbers. Wildwood
  • The daffodils seem to have gone over very quickly whilst spring bulbs like bluebells and wood anemones are rushing into flower.
  • Planting pot-grown woodland wildflowers such as primrose, wood anemone, foxglove and pink campion can further enhance the habitat.
  • Wood anemones, epimediums, bugbanes, and toad lilies create intricate tapestries under flowering shrubs and trees.
  • Though for me the prettiest picture was the short white climb through wood anemones that brought us out of the valley and set us up for pastures where lambs posed on tree trunks and gambolled on grassy knolls to a backdrop of Helmsley Castle.
  • Spring flowers - celandines, primroses, violets, wood anemones - were followed by pyramid and early purple orchids, wild thyme and rockrose.
  • There are patches of wood-sorrel, wood anemone and greater stitchwort in the ground layer; a wide variety of fungi appear in autumn.
  • Primroses, cowslips, pansies, and the regular open-eyed white blossom of the wood anemone (or, to use the more elegant Hampshire name, the windflower), were set under our feet as thick as daisies in a meadow; but the pretty weed that we came to seek was coyer; and Ellen began to fear that we had mistaken the place or the season. Our Village
View all
This website uses cookies to make Linguix work for you. By using this site, you agree to our cookie policy