offenceless

ADJECTIVE
  1. incapable of offending or attacking
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How To Use offenceless In A Sentence

  • What, man! there are ways to recover the general again: you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice; even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue to him again, and he is yours. Othello
  • What, man! there are ways to recover the general again: you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice, even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue to him again, and he's yours. Othello, the Moor of Venice
  • What, man! there are ways to recover the general again: you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice; even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue to him again, and he's yours. Elson Grammar School Literature v4
  • Wood tells us that this poem "being not rightly understood, and carped at by many, came out soon after a pamphlet written in prose and poetry, entitled 'A free and offenceless justification of a late published and most maliciously misinterpreted Poem, &c. Introduction
  • I thought a man would have been ashamed to punish the pure self-defence of folk so offenceless as the Belgians. The Appetite of Tyranny Including Letters to an Old Garibaldian
  • She even struck the poor, offenceless creature many blows; and from this there was no redemption, for she was in sad disrepute with Mr. and Mrs. Smith; and, after the young ladies 'departure, she had no friend at all, for I was too powerless to be of use to her. Autobiography of a female slave,
  • That fastens as flame on the sight of them tame and offenceless, and ranged as to die. Poems and Ballads (Third Series) Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III
  • What, man! there are ways to recover the general again: you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice, even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue to him again, and he’s yours. Othello, the Moore of Venice
  • Thus Fool offenceless shall lie defenceless at thy mercy and, so lying, sleep until joyous day shall banish thy so virginal fears! The Geste of Duke Jocelyn
  • What! man; there are ways to recover the general again; you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice; even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion. Act II. Scene III. Othello, the Moor of Venice
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