kyphosis

NOUN
  1. an abnormal backward curve to the vertebral column
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How To Use kyphosis In A Sentence

  • It was just a kyphosis, of course, with a patch of teratoma that had two fingers, four teeth, and a thick loop of lower intestine. Blood Lite II: Overbite
  • The symptoms of kyphosis may resemble other spinal conditions or deformities, or may be a result of an injury or infection.
  • The term 'crookback' was certainly used to describe the outward-bending spinal condition of kyphosis. The Times Literary Supplement
  • Patients develop thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis as vertebral height is lost.
  • If anyone in your family had osteoporosis (including your mother, father and sisters), or broke a bone when they were over 50 following a trivial injury, or had a kyphosis (a hump on the upper back), then your risk rises. Dr Luisa Dillner's guide to ... preventing osteoporosis
  • Patients with postural kyphosis can generally correct the kyphosis by making a conscious effort to do so.
  • In cases of kyphosis it is a mistake to try to straighten the spine. Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy A Manual of Peroral Endoscopy and Laryngeal Surgery
  • For example, there is some concern that interspinous devices may lead to kyphosis, but to date there are no data to suggest that kyphosis develops and this will only be proven or disproven over time. Spine-Health - Back Pain, Neck Pain, Lower Back Pain
  • The first of these curvatures is called kyphosis, in which the curvature is posterior; second, lordosis, in which the curvature is anterior; third, scoliosis, in which it is lateral, to the right or left. Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine
  • A similar but less marked type of kyphosis may follow upon compression fracture of the spine -- in the condition known as traumatic spondylitis; and as a result of other lesions, such as osteomalacia, or malignant disease, in which the bodies undergo softening and yield, so that the spinous processes project posteriorly. Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities—Head—Neck. Sixth Edition.
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