Kellogg

[ US /ˈkɛɫɔɡ/ ]
NOUN
  1. United States food manufacturer who (with his brother) developed a breakfast cereal of crisp flakes of rolled and toasted wheat and corn; he established a company to manufacture the cereal (1860-1951)
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How To Use Kellogg In A Sentence

  • This is where big, burly maximum-security convicts march around shouting dire, streety cautions about bad behavior at the impeccable haircuts of Wharton and Kellogg. Rob Warmowski: Kill A Company, Face Murder Charges: The Fair Consequence Of Corporate Personhood
  • Christopher Jillings is the postdoctoral fellow of the Kellogg Radiation Laboratory. He is Canadian.
  • Saturday was breakfast and more chat until car-picking up and the eventual drive back to Oxford -- arrived in plenty of time to shower and prink / preen before the Kellogg College formal hall. Stuff and more stuff
  • As man and boy my breakfast has consisted of one Weetabix with a covering of Kellogg's Cornflakes with unrefined dark Cane sugar served in a hemispherical bowl with semi-skimmed milk and a heavy ‘Old English’ pattern spoon.
  • In 1925, when Kellogg was sixty-five years old, he established the Fellowship Corporation to distribute charitable gifts anonymously.
  • In one case, says Brancatelli, Kellogg saw a lawn mower in a truck belonging to Williams's husband and declared him a "landscaper" for the mortgage records. Mortgages and Madness
  • A toaster strudel is a ready-made, frozen breakfast pastry sold by Pillsbury that was introduced in the 1980s as a rival to the popular toaster treat, Pop Tarts, made by Kelloggs. Homemade Toaster Strudel | Baking Bites
  • Christopher Jillings is the postdoctoral fellow of the Kellogg Radiation Laboratory. He is Canadian.
  • Nor have they known the pant-wetting excitement of a Kellogg's multipack the same boring cereal, just smaller. How Britain fell in love with breakfast
  • Congressional hearing about massive vehicle recalls necessitated by design issues with multiple models, the Japanese automaker is still in the early phases of crisis management, according to Daniel Diermeier, IBM Professor of Regulation and Competitive Practice at the Kellogg School of Management. BusinessWeek.com --
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